San Jose Police Department

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San Jose Police Department
Abbreviation SJPD
CA - San Jose Police.jpg
Patch of the San Jose Police Department.
San Jose Police Department Star.png
Logo of the San Jose Police Department.
Agency overview
Formed 1849
Annual budget $285 million
Legal personality Governmental: Government agency
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdiction* State of California, USA
Size 178.2 square miles (462 km2)
Population 1,000,000+
General nature
Operational structure
Headquarters 201 W. Mission Street
San Jose, CA 95110
Sworn members 1055 Officers
Unsworn members 370 Civilian
Agency executive Larry Esquivel, Chief
Facilities
Stations 4
Airbases 1
Helicopters 1
Website
San Jose Police website
Footnotes
* Divisional agency: Division of the country, over which the agency has usual operational jurisdiction.

The San Jose Police Department (SJPD) is the police agency for San Jose, California, which has contributed to San Jose being one of the safest large cities in the United States.[1] The San Jose Police Department is led by acting Chief of Police Larry Esquivel

In September 2007, the San Jose Police Department began making all its Calls for Service available to the public [2] through a partnership with Crime Reports.com.[3] San Jose is the first American city to make all 911 calls available in near real time,[clarification needed] an event which was publicized throughout the United States.

History[edit]

The San Jose Police Department was founded in 1849. At that time, California had only been a state for a short while and San Jose was the capital (soon to be Vallejo). During its beginnings the most common offences recorded for the department were public intoxication and vagrancy according to old jailhouse record. In 1880, the department was averaging at 120 arrests per month and the position of police chief was created and the chief also was the superintendent of the city jail at the time. By the late 1880s, the department went from 10 officers at its beginning to 25. In the 1900s, the department became much more serious. There were more rules and regulations regarding police officers. Officers now needed to go through field training and revolver training. The department along with many others drastically changed with the introduction of the automobile and the first motorcycle units evolved too. The motorcycle unit mainly charged people with speeding and spent a considerable amount of time in court. San Jose was one of the first places to use radio and phone technology to help officers perform their jobs much better. In 1925, the city council released the first rules and regulations manual to all department members. It was the inspiration for the duty manual that the department uses today. The San Jose Police Academy first started out as a police college for aspiring officers to earn four year bachelors degrees. Men made up the entire police force up until 1945 when Ida Waalkes became the first female to be a sworn officer with the San Jose Police Department. Community policing became popular with the department in the early 1990s as specific geographic areas were now being drawn out and assigned so officers may become familiar with their community and its inhabitants.[4]

Uniform and Equipment[edit]

The uniform of the department consists of a dark navy blue shirt. On the left side of the chest the badge is pinned. The badge of a regular police officer is a silver badge reading San Jose Police Department and the officers badge number. More detailed and nicer badges are given to higher ranking police officers. Breast pockets appear on both sides of the shirt and the San Jose Police Department patch is worn on both arms. Pants are regular navy blue pants with a white line running down the side of the leg. SWAT uniforms are standard, however some SWAT officers have camouflage or green uniforms.

Weapons and Equipment[edit]

The San Jose Police Departments officers normally carry tasers. The standard taser for the department was recently upgraded and is the TASER(R) X26P(TM) Smart Weapon.[5] Officers are issued OC Spray, handcuffs, a baton, flashlight plus a handgun and two spare magazines. Squad cars are normally armed with shotguns and officers are allowed to purchase semi automatic "assault weapons" that are banned for civilians in the state of California. The chief must sign off for the officer to obtain the right to purchase and possess such weapons. An officer is also required to go on a four day course. The officers must purchase these weapons with their own money, they are allowed to bring them home and use them for personal/recreational use.[6]

In mid-2014, the department returned a mine-resistant military vehicle to the federal government.[7]

Mission statement[edit]

  • Promote public safety
  • Prevent, suppress, and investigate crimes
  • Provide emergency and non-emergency services
  • Create and maintain strong community partnerships
  • Adapt a multidisciplinary approach to solving community problems
  • Develop and promote a diverse, professional workforce

Department chain of command (Office of the Chief of Police)[edit]

  • Chief of Police Larry Esquivel
  • Assistant Chief Edgardo Garcia
  • Deputy Chief Christopher (Dave) Knopf, Bureau of Administration
  • Deputy Chief Dave Hober, Bureau of Field Operations
  • Deputy Chief Phan Ngo, Bureau of Investigations
  • Deputy Chief Jeff Marozick, Bureau of Technical Services

Police divisions[edit]

Controversy[edit]

As with any department, the SJPD has had its fair share of controversy over the years. In 2014, the department had been found to be using high tech cellphone spying systems. Stingrays, as they are called look like cell phone towers but instead pick up and record cell phone data. It was showed that the federal government gave the department a $500,000 grant for the technology. The SJPD spokesperson refused to comment on the situation.[8]

In 2009, a 27 year old Vietnamese man was shot and killed by the San Jose Police. Daniel Pham killed his brother with a knife and the department claimed he was dead on the scene. However, the family reports that they pleaded with officers not to kill Daniel Pham due to the fact he had a mental illness.[9]

In March 2014, Officer Geoffrey Graves was accused of raping a woman. He turned himself into Santa Clara County Jail and as arranged on March 24.[10]

Ranks[edit]

Rank Insignia
Chief 4 Gold Stars.svg
Assistant Chief 3 Gold Stars.svg
Deputy Chief 2 Gold Stars.svg
Captain Captain insignia gold.svg
Lieutenant US-O1 insignia.svg
Sergeant
South Carolina Highway Patrol Sergeant Rank Chevrons.svg
Officer N/A

Fallen officers[edit]

Since the establishment of the San Jose Police Department, 11 officers have died in the line of duty. [11]

Officer Date of Death Details
Sergeant Morris Vandyck Hubbard
Saturday, July 12, 1924
Gunfire
Officer John Buck
Wednesday, April 5, 1933
Gunfire
Officer John J. Covalesk
Wednesday, November 15, 1950
Gunfire
Officer Richard E. Huerta
Thursday, August 6, 1970
Gunfire
Officer Robert A. (Bob) White
Sunday, January 27, 1985
Electrocuted
Officer Henry I. Bunch
Monday, July 29, 1985
Gunfire
Officer Robert Lee Wirht
Thursday, September 8, 1988
Vehicle pursuit
Officer Gordon A. Silva
Friday, January 20, 1989
Gunfire
Officer Gene Ronald Simpson
Friday, January 20, 1989
Gunfire
Police Officer Desmond J. Casey
Monday, October 25, 1999
Aircraft accident
Police Officer Jeffrey Fontana
Sunday, October 28, 2001
Gunfire

See also[edit]


References[edit]

External links[edit]