San Jose Sports & Entertainment Enterprises

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San Jose Sports & Entertainment Enterprises
Type Private company
Genre Sports and Entertainment
Headquarters San Jose, California, United States
Products San Jose Sharks
Worcester Sharks
SAP Center
Divisions Sharks Sports and Entertainment

San Jose Sports & Entertainment Enterprises (SJSEE) is a private company based in San Jose, California which owns the San Jose Sharks of the National Hockey League, the Worcester Sharks of the American Hockey League, and manages the SAP Center arena. The company was formed in 2002 after George Gund III put these assets up for sale; Gund requested then-Sharks president and CEO Greg Jamison to find a group of local investors to buy the team and keep them in San Jose.[1]

Investors[edit]

Four owners have a stake in the organization.[2]

From the organization's purchase of the team until October 2011, Greg Jamison served as the Sharks' governor at meetings of the National Hockey League's Board of Governors. In October 2011, Kevin Compton took over the role when Jamison became involved with a group looking to purchase the Phoenix Coyotes.[3] In January 2013 Plattner purchased the shares of Kevin Compton and Stratton Sclavos and took over as governor.[4] In the following months, Plattner bought out shares owned by former San Jose mayor Tom McEnery, E. Floyd Kvamme and Harvey Armstrong.[5]

Other former investors include former San Francisco 49ers player Brent Jones,[6] venture capitalist Boots Del Biaggio,[7] and former Brocade Communications Systems CEO Greg Reyes.[8] George Gund III maintained a minority stake in the team until his death in 2013.[9]

Assets[edit]

SJSE owns the San Jose Sharks franchise as well as their minor league affiliate, the Worcester Sharks. A wholly owned subsidiary, Sharks Sports and Entertainment manages the operations, marketing, and ticket sales for the Sharks and events held at SAP Center at San Jose. SJSE is also a minority shareholder in the San Jose Earthquakes of Major League Soccer.[10]

References[edit]