Sanauli

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Sanauli
Archeological site
Sanauli is located in India
Sanauli
Sanauli
Coordinates: 29°14′46″N 77°21′03″E / 29.24611°N 77.35083°E / 29.24611; 77.35083Coordinates: 29°14′46″N 77°21′03″E / 29.24611°N 77.35083°E / 29.24611; 77.35083
State Uttar Pradesh
Time zone Indian Standard Time (UTC+5.30)

Sanauli is an archeological site located in Barot tehsil, Baghpat district, Uttar Pradesh, India, where 125 graves belonging to Indus Valley Civilisation were found. These graves are dated c. 2200–1800 BC. Sanauli, discovered in 2005, is a fairly recent addition to the list of Indus Valley Civilisation sites in India.

Excavations[edit]

The site at Sanauli was accidentally discovered by people levelling agricultural land. The Archeological Survey of India began excavations at the site during September 2005.[1]

Burials[edit]

As of 2007, the graves found are dated c. 2200–1800 BC.[2] and are 125 in number. These are all oriented in a north-south direction and most are identified as primary burials. Some of the burials are identified also as secondary and multiple burials and animal bones are also discovered next to human bones. The age group of buried starts from 1–2 years and includes all age groups and both male and female. Burial goods generally consisted of odd number of vases (3, 5, 7, 9, 11 etc.) placed near the head, with dish-on-stand usually placed below hip area as well as antenna swords, sheath of copper, terracotta figurines, gold and copper bangles, beads of semi-precious stones (two necklace of long barrel shape) etc.[1]

Remains of a burnt brick wall with a finished inner surface ran along the eastern side of the burial. A dish-on-stands and a violin shaped flat copper container having nearly 35 arrow head shaped copper pieces placed in a row are included in other important findings from Sanauli.[2]

A burial ground of this numbers should have been associated with a large habitation site, but so far such an habitation nearby has not been located.[2]

Dish-on-Stand[edit]

The survey found that dish-on-stand was usually placed below the hip area, but in some cases was placed near the head or feet. It was clearly an important part of burial goods. Its mushroom-shaped form has not found at any other archeological sites. It was used as holding stand and in one case, held the head of a goat.[2]

Importance[edit]

The Archeological Survey of India has categorised this site as a prominent cemetery site of the late Harappan period.[1] There is evidence suggesting animal sacrifice in some middle and upper level burials.[2]

See also====See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Excavations - 2006-2007". Archeological Survey of India. Retrieved 29 June 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Singh, Upinder (2008). A History of Ancient and Early Medieval India: From the Stone Age to the 12th Centuruy. New Delhi: Pearson Education India. p. 215. ISBN 978-813-17-1120-0. Retrieved 28 June 2012.