Sandra Fong

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Sandra Fong
Personal information
Nationality  United States
Born (1990-04-15) April 15, 1990 (age 24)
New York, New York
Height 1.57 m (5 ft 2 in)
Weight 57 kg (126 lb)
Sport
Sport Shooting
Event(s) 10 m air rifle (AR40)
50 m rifle 3 positions (STR3X20)
Club Ridgewood Rifle Club[1]
Coached by David Johnson (national)[2]

Sandra Fong (born April 15, 1990, in New York, New York) is an American Olympic sport shooter.[3]

She is a multiple-time American junior record holder, and a three-time medalist (one gold and two silver) for the small-bore rifle prone and rifle three positions at the U.S. National Shooting Championships.[4] At the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, Fong competed in the women's 50 m rifle 3 positions, finishing in 21st place. She won a gold medal, as a member of the U.S. rifle shooting team, at the 2010 ISSF World Shooting Championships in Munich, Germany.[5]

Family life and education[edit]

Fong was born and raised on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York by her parents Nicole Bergman, an attorney, and Yuman Fong, a resident surgeon at the Memorial Sloan–Kettering Cancer Center, emigrating from Hong Kong.[6] She began rifle shooting with her siblings and father as a family sport. Her older sister, Abigail Fong, is a past U.S. national shooting champion, a member of the Princeton University rifle team, and a resident athlete at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado.[7] Her younger sister, Danielle Fong, who has cerebral palsy, is a member of the U.S. Paralympic team (Beijing, 2008).[8]

In 2008, Fong graduated from Hunter College High School in Manhattan, where she also competed for track and field and swimming.[1] She attended Princeton University as a pre-medicine student and theater and anthropology major, and eventually joined her sister Abigail to become a member for the University's rifle shooting club, graduating in 2013.[9][10] She now attends the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, after having been admitted to Mount Sinai in her sophomore year at Princeton.[11]

She is Jewish, and is a member of Temple Shaaray Tefila in New York City.[12][13]

Shooting career[edit]

Since beginning the sport, Fong had competed in numerous shooting tournaments, where she achieved junior records and top finishes for the small-bore rifle prone and rifle three positions, including three medals (one gold and two silver) at the U.S. National Shooting Championships (2006–08).[4]

At the age of eighteen, Fong reached her breakthrough in shooting, when she edged out her sister Abigail by three tenths of a point (0.3) in the rifle three positions at the U.S. Olympic Team Trials in Fort Benning, Georgia, with a score of 672.7 points.[14] Finishing second from the trials, she guaranteed a qualifying place for the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, as the youngest member of the U.S. shooting team.[8]

At the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, Fong competed in the women's 50 m rifle 3 positions, along with her teammate Jamie Beyerle. She was able to shoot 196 targets each in prone and kneeling position, and 185 in standing, for a total score of 577 points, finishing in twenty-first place.[15]

Two years after competing in her first Olympics, Fong captured two silver medals for the small-bore rifle prone and rifle three positions at the 2010 Championships of the Americas (CAT Games) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.[2] She also helped the U.S. rifle shooting team (along with Jamie Beyerle and Amy Sowash) win the gold medal, and set a world record of 1,758 points at the 2010 ISSF World Shooting Championships in Munich, Germany.[5][16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Boyle, Christina (August 2, 2008). "From judo to fencing, 8 locals dream of winning big at Olympics". Daily News (New York). Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "ISSF Profile – Sandra Fong". ISSF. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Sandra Fong". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Sandra Fong Shoots To Glory". Right Fielders. September 10, 2008. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b McGinty, Katie (August 7, 2010). "Shooting: Golden Richmond Snags Second USA Olympic Quota". USOC Press Box. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  6. ^ Thomas, Katie (August 8, 2008). "Swimmer Inspires Sisters to Shoot for Beijing". New York Times. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  7. ^ Wu, Jason (April 10, 2007). "Fong takes aim with world's best". Daily Princetonian. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  8. ^ a b Paul, Alan (August 13, 2008). "Getting to know: Sandra Fong". NBC Olympics. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  9. ^ Tucci, Peter (October 2, 2008). "Sniper sisters shoot round the world". Daily Princetonian. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  10. ^ [1]
  11. ^ [2]
  12. ^ [3]
  13. ^ [4]
  14. ^ "Beyerle, Fong in the Lead Women's 3-Position Rifle at 2008 U.S. Olympic Team Trials". The Shooting Wire. May 21, 2008. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  15. ^ "Women's 50m Rifle 3 Positions Qualification". NBC Olympics. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  16. ^ "50th World Shooting Championships: Day 6 Report "A Golden Day"". Ammonland Shooting Sports News. August 6, 2010. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 

External links[edit]