Sandra Williams

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Sandra Williams
Member of the Ohio House of Representatives
from the 11th district
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 2, 2007
Preceded by Annie L. Key
Personal details
Born (1968-10-24) October 24, 1968 (age 45)
Cleveland, Ohio
Political party Democratic
Residence Cleveland, Ohio
Alma mater Cleveland State University, Tiffin University
Profession Criminal Justice
Religion Christian

Sandra Williams is a Democratic member of the Ohio House of Representatives who has represented the 11th District since 2007.

Career[edit]

A native of Cleveland, Williams attended Cleveland State University and Tiffin University. Williams worked in the field of criminal justice for more than a decade. She worked in several different positions, including as a corrections officer, probation officer, parole officer and mediator. Williams also served as a member of the United States Army Reserve from 1987 to 1995.

Before being elected as a state representative, Williams worked within the Statehouse as a legislative aide.

Ohio House of Representatives[edit]

After Williams' former boss Annie L. Key decided not seek reelection in 2006, she ran for the safe Democratic seat. Williams won the Democratic Primary with 30.38% of the vote in a field of six candidates.[1] She was unopposed in the November general election.[2]

In 2008, Williams was unopposed in the March Democratic Primary,[3] and won the general election with 85.45% of the vote against Republican Rosalind McAllister.[4]

In 2009, Williams was elected as President of the Ohio Legislative Black Caucus, and continues to serve in that capacity through the 130th General Assembly.[5] Speaker Armond Budish also named Williams as Chairman of the Economic Development Committee for the 128th General Assembly.[6] She also served as Vice Chairman of the Public Utilities Committee,[7] as well as a member of the Financial Institutions, Real Estate and Securities Committee and the Veterans Affairs Committee.

In 2010, Williams was again unopposed in the March Democratic Primary,[8] and again defeated challenger Roz McAllister with 82.24% of the vote.[9]

With the 129th General Assembly, with Williams now in the minority, she served as ranking member of the Economic and Small Business Development Committee, as well as a member of the Criminal Justice Committee, and the Public Utilities Committee.

Williams won election to a final term in 2012 by defeating challenger Tony Perry in the primary with 81.07% of the vote.[10] She was unopposed in the general election.[11]

Initiatives and positions[edit]

Williams has been a vocal critic of Governor John Kasich's lack of diversity upon choosing his cabinet, stating, "I would hope that Kasich would understand that this state is very diverse.... African-Americans, as well as other minorities, make up a significant portion of the state's population and his cabinet, as well as his staff, should reflect that."[12] She also has stated that there is a "strong possibility" that Gov. Kasich and the GOP controlled legislature would curtail efforts to expand minority business contracting.[13][14][15]

A staunch opponent of collective bargaining reform brought forth in S.B. 5, Williams believes that Republicans could risk defeat if the continue with the bill.[16]

As chairperson of the Legislative Black Caucus, Williams was vocal about a controversial initiative that would require a photo ID to cast a ballot. Williams believes that doing so would "disenfranchise" minority voters from participating in an election. She has called it an intentional attack on the Democratic Party.[17]

In April, 2011, Williams made news when citizens concerned about Governor Kasich's proposed budget tried to visit legislators' Columbus offices and were stopped by state troopers and a police dog. Williams, who had an appointment scheduled with the group, said the dog was unnecessary and intimidating.[18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Election Results - Democratic Ohio House of Representatives: May 2, 2006". Ohio Secretary of State. Retrieved 2013-08-14. 
  2. ^ "Election Results - Ohio House of Representatives: November 7, 2006". Ohio Secretary of State. Retrieved 2013-08-14. 
  3. ^ "Election Results - Democratic State Representative: March 4, 2008". Ohio Secretary of State. Retrieved 2013-08-14. 
  4. ^ "Election Results - State Representative: November 4, 2008". Ohio Secretary of State. Retrieved 2013-08-14. 
  5. ^ "Ohio Legislative Black Caucus". Retrieved 2011-03-30. 
  6. ^ Rep Sandra Williams appointed chair
  7. ^ Guillen, Joe (2011-03-29). "Ohio's collective bargaining overhaul could see nearly a dozen changes before House committee vote on Tuesday". The Plain Dealer. Retrieved 2011-03-30. 
  8. ^ "Election Results - State Representative - Democratic: May 4, 2010". Ohio Secretary of State. Retrieved 2013-08-14. 
  9. ^ "Election Results - Ohio House of Representatives: November 2, 2010". Ohio Secretary of State. Retrieved 2013-08-14. 
  10. ^ "Election Results - Democratic Ohio Representative: March 6, 2012". Ohio Secretary of State. Retrieved 2013-08-14. 
  11. ^ "Election Results - Final Results - November 2012" (Microsoft Excel). Ohio Secretary of State. Retrieved 2013-08-14. 
  12. ^ Fields, Reginald (2011-01-13). "Ohio Gov. John Kasich's 20 Cabinet appointments so far lack diversity". The Plain Dealer. Retrieved 2011-03-30. 
  13. ^ "Black lawmakers blast Kasich for lack of diverse Cabinet". Toledo Blade. 2011-01-27. Retrieved 2013-08-14. 
  14. ^ Fields, Reginald (2011-01-27). "Ohio Statehouse Democrats demand Gov. John Kasich embrace diversity, add minorities to his all-white cabinet". The Plain Dealer. Retrieved 2011-03-30. 
  15. ^ Siegel, Jim (2011-01-28). "Blacks ask Senate to reject Kasich's all-white cabinet". Columbus Dispatch. Archived from the original on 2011-07-10. Retrieved 2013-08-14 (blocked). 
  16. ^ Guillen, Joe (2011-03-29). "Ohio's collective bargaining overhaul could see nearly a dozen changes before House committee vote on Tuesday". The Plain Dealer. Retrieved 2011-03-30. 
  17. ^ Siegel, Jim (2011-06-22). "Photo-ID rule removed from elections bill". Columbus Dispatch. Retrieved 2011-06-24. 
  18. ^ Guillen, Joe (2011-04-21). "Citizens say police dog, state troopers intimidated them on visit to legislators' offices". The Plain Dealer. Retrieved 2011-04-22. 

External links[edit]