Sands Macao

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Sands Macao
Sandsmacao.png
Sands.JPG
Opening date May 18, 2004
Number of rooms 289 suites
Total gaming space 229,000 sq ft (21,300 m2)
Casino type Land-based
Owner Las Vegas Sands
Website Sands Macao

Sands Macao (Chinese: 金沙娛樂場) is a casino resort located in Macau Peninsula, Macau, China. It is owned and operated by the Las Vegas Sands Corporation, and was designed by Steelman Partners, LLP.[1] It comprises a 229,000 square feet (21,300 m2) casino, and a 289-suite hotel.

Las Vegas Sands chairman Sheldon Adelson has said that his company will soon be a mainly Chinese enterprise, and quipped that Las Vegas should be called "America's Macau".[2] The president and chief operating officer of Las Vegas Sands Corporation predicted on February 12, 2007 that Macau has topped that of the Las Vegas Strip and will more than double again by 2010.[3]

History[edit]

An Arabian-style theme park built as part of the unrelated Fisherman's Wharf lies to its east

The casino opened on May 18, 2004 at a cost of $240 million[clarification needed]. All of the mortgage bonds that were issued to finance construction were paid off in May 2005.[4] In 2006, the casino completed an expansion increasing the casino from 165,000 sq ft (15,300 m2) to 229,000 sq ft (21,300 m2).[5]

A new hotel tower opened in late 2007, bringing the property's total room count to 289.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Steelman Partners LLP
  2. ^ Jonathan Glancey. "Putting on the kitsch". Guardian News and Media Limited. Retrieved 2007-02-26. 
  3. ^ Deena Beasley & Peter Henderson (2007-02-13). "Sands sees Macau gambling doubling by 2010". Reuter. Retrieved 2007-02-14. 
  4. ^ "Harrah's may have missed out in Asia". The Taipei Times. Retrieved 2006-06-05. 
  5. ^ Tom Jones. "Sands Macao Now the Biggest Casino in the World". CasinoGamblingWeb.com. Retrieved 2006-08-26. 
  6. ^ Las Vegas Sands (28 September 2007). "Preview of Sands Macao Hotel Brings Boutique Hotel Chic to Macao". Retrieved 7 October 2011. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 22°11′30″N 113°33′16″E / 22.19167°N 113.55444°E / 22.19167; 113.55444