Sandy Hollway

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Sandy Hollway
AO
Secretary of the Department of Industry, Technology and Regional Development
In office
20 December 1993 – 25 March 1994
Secretary of the Department of Industry, Science and Technology
In office
25 March 1994 – 11 March 1996
Secretary of the Department of Employment, Education, Training and Youth Affairs
In office
11 March 1996 – 29 December 1996
Personal details
Born David Alexander Hollway
Nationality Australia Australian
Alma mater University of Sydney
Occupation Public servant

David Alexander "Sandy" Hollway AO was a senior Australian public servant and policymaker. He retired from the Australian Public Service in 1996 to head the 2000 Summer Olympics.

Background and career[edit]

Hollway graduated from the University of Sydney in 1968, with first-class honours in philosophy.[1] He started his Australian Public Service career in the Department of External Affairs in 1969.[2]

Between 1988 and 1990, Hollway was Chief of Staff for Prime Minister Bob Hawke.[3][4][5]

In 1993, Hollway was appointed Secretary of the Department of Industry, Technology and Regional Development (later the Department of Industry, Science and Technology).[6][7] At the beginning of 1996, Hollway shifted to become Secretary of the Department of Employment, Education, Training and Youth Affairs, staying in the role less than a year.[8]

Hollway left his Secretary position at the end of 1996, to take up employment as Chief Executive Officer of the Sydney Organising Committee for the Olympic Games (SOCOG).[9] Prior to the games, Hollway was embroiled in controversy as an inquiry was launched in the Olympic's ticketing fiasco after it was rvealed most of the best tickets were not available to Australian sports fans, instead being put aside for sales at triple the face value to businesses.[10]

Hollway has served as a member of boards for a number of Australian Government organisations including CSIRO, ANSTO and Austrade.[11]

In 2008, Hollway provided support to Beijing Olympic Games organisers, one of only a few foreigners called upon to advise Chinese authorities.[12] Also that year, in March, he was appointed by then Prime Minister Kevin Rudd to act as chief mediator between Canberra and Port Moresby over the future of the Kokoda Trail.[13]

In October 2008 he was appointed to be Australia's first Special Envoy on Whale Conservation,[14] to try to persuade Japan to curtail its Antarctic whaling.[15] In the role, Hollway presented Australia's case at meetings with representatives of both like-minded and pro-whaling nations.[16][17] Critics drew attention to his lack of success and high cost to taxpayers.[18][19][20][21]

In 2010, Hollway was appointed Chair of the Independent review of aid effectiveness panel, undertaking a review of Australia's aid program, administered by AusAID.[22][23]

Hollway is currently working as a Consultant at TFG International.[24]

Awards[edit]

Hollway was made an Officer of the Order of Australia in January 2002 for service to public administration, particularly as a senior adviser to government, to sport through the Sydney Organising Committee for the Olympic Games, and to the community.[25]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cole-Adams, Peter (14 December 1993). "Troubleshooter with a sense of fun". The Canberra Times. p. 9. 
  2. ^ Flitton, Daniel (16 January 2010). "Bureaucratic heavyweights from Class of '69". The Age (Fairfax Media). p. 3. Archived from the original on 31 January 2015. 
  3. ^ Sand Hollway AO: Syndicates 64 & 72, The CEO Institute, archived from the original on 24 February 2014 
  4. ^ Mr Sandy Hollway AO, Australian Government, archived from the original on 6 January 2012 
  5. ^ "Sydney Olympics CEO Sandy Hollway appointed to Australia-India Council" (Press release). Australian High Commission India. 29 August 2002. Archived from the original on 11 May 2013. 
  6. ^ Keating, Paul (13 December 1993). "Public Sector Appointments" (Press release). Archived from the original on 11 January 2014. 
  7. ^ CA 7659: Department of Industry, Technology and Regional Development, Central Office, National Archives of Australia, retrieved 2 March 2013 
  8. ^ CA 8245: Department of Employment, Education, Training and Youth Affairs, National Office, National Archives of Australia, retrieved 2 March 2014 
  9. ^ Howard, John (29 December 1996). "Appointment of Departmental Secretaries" (Press release). Archived from the original on 3 February 2014. 
  10. ^ "Sydney Olympic chiefs face ticket probe". The Independent (UK). 3 November 1999. Archived from the original on 3 March 2014. 
  11. ^ Sandy Hollway AO: Deputy Chairman, CRC Australia, archived from the original on 24 February 2014 
  12. ^ Sandy Hollways' Biography, Platinum Speakers + Entertainers, archived from the original on 24 February 2014 
  13. ^ Johnson, Chris (2 May 2008). "Diplomat lands task of stopping whale hunt". The Age (Fairfax Media). Archived from the original on 16 October 2011. 
  14. ^ Garrett, Peter (20 October 2008), Appointment of Sandy Hollway as Australia's Special Envoy on Whale Conservation, archived from the original on 14 February 2014 
  15. ^ Darby, Andrew (20 October 2008). "Whaling envoy in dialogue with Japan". The Sydney Morning Herald (Fairfax Media). Archived from the original on 26 May 2014. 
  16. ^ Lewis, Steve; Heger, Ursula (13 January 2010). "Whale envoy Sandy Hollway lobbies Japan as costs mount". The Courier Mail. 
  17. ^ Lewis, Steve (13 January 2010). "Japan keeps whaling as cost of envoy Sandy Hollway hits $500k". News Limited. Archived from the original on 15 January 2010. 
  18. ^ Birmingham, Simon (28 May 2009). "All blubber, no bone in Government whaling plans" (Press release). 
  19. ^ Williams, Peter (9 September 2009). "Whaling Envoy to Stay Despite Poor Result". The West Australian. 
  20. ^ Lewis, Steve (13 January 2010). "Whale envoy 'an expensive failure'". The Daily Telegraph (News Limited). 
  21. ^ "Concern at whaling envoy cost of $1,800 a day". The West Australian. 30 May 2009. Archived from the original on 26 May 2014. 
  22. ^ The Panel: Independent Review of Aid Effectiveness, Australian Government, archived from the original on 25 January 2014 
  23. ^ Message from the Chair, Australian Government, archived from the original on 11 February 2014 
  24. ^ Sandy Hollway AO, TFG Internationa, archived from the original on 26 January 2014 
  25. ^ Search Australian Honours: HOLLWAY, David Alexander, Australian Government, archived from the original on 2 March 2014 
Government offices
Preceded by
Neville Stevens
Secretary of the Department of Industry, Technology and Regional Development
1993 – 1994
Succeeded by
Himself
as Secretary of the Department of Industry, Science and Technology
Succeeded by
Andrew Podger
as Secretary of the Department of Housing and Regional Development
Preceded by
Himself
as Secretary of the of Industry, Technology and Regional Development
Secretary of the Department of Industry, Science and Technology
1994 - 1996
Succeeded by
Greg Taylor
as Secretary of the Department of Industry, Science and Tourism
Preceded by
Derek Volker
as Secretary of the Department of Employment, Education and Training
Secretary of the Department of Employment, Education, Training and Youth Affairs
1996
Succeeded by
Steve Sedgwick