Sanjay Sarma

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Sanjay E. Sarma (born May 1968) is a professor of mechanical engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is credited with developing many standards and technologies in the commercial RFID industry.[1] At MIT he is Director of Digital Learning.[2] Sarma also serves on the board of the MOOC provider edX as a representative of MIT.

Early life[edit]

Sarma earned his B.Tech from Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur in 1989, his ME from Carnegie Mellon University in 1992 and his Ph.D. from University of California, Berkeley in 1995.[3]

Personal life[edit]

Sarma is the son of the former Secretary, Government of India, Dr. E. A. S. Sarma.[4] He is married to Dr. Gitanjali Swamy, daughter of Dr. Subramanian Swamy, an Indian politician. They have one daughter.

Career[edit]

Sarma began his career at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1996, after working for Schlumberger, Inc. and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories.[5]

Sarma and Dr. David Brock began work on RFID in 1998. In 1999, he co-founded the Auto-ID center at MIT together with Prof. Sunny Siu and Dr. David Brock of MIT, and Kevin Ashton of P&G in order to make the vision of standards based RFID a commercial reality.[6] The center opened in 1999 as an industry sponsored, MIT research project with the express goal of creating a global open standard system to put RFID everywhere Auto-ID Center. When Siu departed, Sarma served as the research director and then the chairman of research. Under Sarma's leadership with Kevin Ashton,[7] the number of sponsors grew to 103, and additional labs were funded at other major universities around the world. Once the EPC System was developed, MIT licensed it to non-profit standards body GS1 to create EPCglobal, and the Auto-ID Center project reached a successful conclusion.[8] The center was renamed Auto-ID Labs and continue their research.

Prof. Sarma is a frequent industry speaker and serves on the Board of Governors of EPCglobal and GS1 US,[9] and as a permanent guest of GS1. From 2012 to 2014 he served as the Chairman of the Board of EPCglobal.[10] He also served as CTO and Director (Board Member) of OATSystems, a leader in the RFID market. OATSystems was acquired in 2008 by Checkpoint Systems.[11]

Sarma is a recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER Award,[12] the Cecil and Ida Green Career Development Chair at MIT, the Den Hartog Award for Excellence in Teaching, the Keenan Award for Innovations in Undergraduate Education, the MacVicar Fellowship[13] and the New England Business and Technology Award. He was named as Business Week's 'e.biz 25 Innovators' list and Information Week's "Innovators and Influencers".[14] In 2010 he received the inaugural RFID Journal Special Achievement Award.[15] He has over 50 publications in computational geometry, virtual reality, manufacturing, CAD, RFID, security and embedded computing.[16][17][citation needed]

In his lectures on Dynamics (MIT Course 2.003) Sarma often refers to the "Magic Formula" and the "Super Magic Formula." Many of his lectures are available online.[18] Sarma also teaches manufacturing. Sarma was also a member of the Production in an Innovation Economy Commission formed by MIT in 2011.[19] The commission released two books.[20][21]

In November 2012, Professor Sarma was appointed Director of Digital Learning at MIT with a mandate to assess how initiatives such as MITx and EdX are affecting instruction on campus.[22] The MIT Office of Digital Learning, which he leads, now includes MITx and MIT's historic OpenCourseWare project. In April 2013, Professor Sarma was appointed as a co-chair of the Task Force for the Future of Education at MIT.[23] The Task Force published its final report in August 2014.[24]

Sarma is also on the Board of Advisors for the global news platform, Fair Observer, focusing on national governments and global companies.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.businessweek.com/stories/2003-09-28/sanjay-sarma-mits-autoid-center
  2. ^ http://edtechtimes.com/2012/11/28/mit-appoints-first-director-of-digital-learning-sanjay-sharma/
  3. ^ http://meche.mit.edu/people/faculty/index.html?id=74
  4. ^ "Retired Bureaucrats and Their Causes". India Today. Retrieved 2014-08-13. 
  5. ^ http://web.mit.edu/lmp/people/sarma.html
  6. ^ Press, Gil (2014-06-18). "A Very Short History of the Internet of Things". Forbes. Retrieved 2014-08-13. 
  7. ^ http://kevinjashton.com/
  8. ^ "GS1 Timeline". GS1. GS1. 
  9. ^ http://www.gs1us.org/about-gs1-us/corporate/board-of-governors
  10. ^ http://www.gs1us.org/Portals/0/gs1%20us%20library/news/EPC_ChairAnnouncement_PressRelease.pdf
  11. ^ http://www.checkpointsystems.com/en/About/press-releases/2008/Checkpoint-Systems-Inc-to-Acquire-OATSystems-Inc.aspx
  12. ^ "NSF CAREER AWARDS, 1997". Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Awards (FY 1997). National Science Foundation. Retrieved 2014-08-13. 
  13. ^ "MacVicar Fellows". Margaret MacVicar Faculty Fellows Program. MIT. Retrieved 2014-08-13. 
  14. ^ "Businessweek's eBiz Innovator and Influencer". Bloomberg Businessweek. Bloomberg. Retrieved 2014-08-13. 
  15. ^ http://www.rfidjournal.com/videos/view?436
  16. ^ http://meche.mit.edu/documents/sesarma_CV.pdf
  17. ^ "Sanjay Sarma Google Scholar Page". Google Scholar. Retrieved 2014-08-12. 
  18. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJ905OQGsBA
  19. ^ http://mit.edu/pie/news/index.html
  20. ^ economy, Suzanne Berger with MIT Task Force on Production in the Innovation (2013). Making in America : from innovation to market. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press. ISBN 978-0262019910. 
  21. ^ Locke, edited by Richard M.; Wellhausen, Rachel L. (2014). Production in the innovation economy. Cambridge: The MIT Press. ISBN 978-0262019927. 
  22. ^ http://web.mit.edu/press/2012/sanjay-sarma-director-of-digital-learning.html
  23. ^ http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2013/institute-wide-task-force-future-of-education-0206
  24. ^ http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/letter-final-report-institute-wide-task-force-future-mit-education

External links[edit]