Santiago Cañizares

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Santiago Cañizares
Santiago Cañizares 24sept2006.jpg
Cañizares playing with Valencia in 2006
Personal information
Full name José Santiago Cañizares Ruiz
Date of birth (1969-12-18) 18 December 1969 (age 44)
Place of birth Madrid, Spain
Height 1.81 m (5 ft 11 12 in)
Playing position Goalkeeper
Youth career
Calvo Sotelo
1985–1988 Real Madrid
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1988–1989 Real Madrid C
1989–1990 Real Madrid B 35 (0)
1988–1992 Real Madrid 0 (0)
1990–1991 Elche (loan) 7 (0)
1991–1992 Mérida (loan) 38 (0)
1992–1994 Celta 74 (0)
1994–1998 Real Madrid 41 (0)
1998–2008 Valencia 305 (0)
Total 500 (0)
National team
1985–1986 Spain U16 10 (0)
1987 Spain U17 1 (0)
1986–1988 Spain U18 8 (0)
1988–1989 Spain U19 5 (0)
1989–1990 Spain U20 6 (0)
1990–1991 Spain U21 3 (0)
1991–1992 Spain U23 6 (0)
1993–2006 Spain 46 (0)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).
This name uses Spanish naming customs: the first or paternal family name is Cañizares and the second or maternal family name is Ruiz.

José Santiago Cañizares Ruiz (Spanish pronunciation: [sanˈtjaɣo kaɲiˈθaɾes]; born 18 December 1969) is a Spanish retired footballer who played as a goalkeeper.

After playing with Real Madrid, mostly as a backup, he finished his career at Valencia, where he appeared in 416 official games during one full decade.[1]

In his prime he was regarded as one of the best goalkeepers in the world. Prior to Euro 2004 – he represented the Spanish national team in three World Cups and as many European Championships – legendary goalkeeper Peter Schmeichel said that he regarded Cañizares as the finest goalkeeper in world football.[2]

Club career[edit]

Born in Madrid but raised in Puertollano, Castile-La Mancha,[3] Cañizares started his club career with Real Madrid in 1988, playing initially with its C team. He started professionally with Elche CF, CP Mérida and Celta de Vigo, making his first La Liga appearance with the Galicians in 1992–93, missing only two league games during his tenure and subsequently returning to Real Madrid.

Unable to cement a starting place, his best output being 26 matches during 1997–98 (but he lost his place in the final part of the year to Bodo Illgner, thus missing the 1998 Champions League final), Cañizares moved to Valencia CF in 1998 to replace the retired Andoni Zubizarreta. He helped the club to win the Spanish Cup and Supercup finals in 1999, also reaching consecutive UEFA Champions League finals (2000 and 2001[4]) and winning national championships in 2002 and 2004, adding the UEFA Cup and Supercup 2004 finals; following the latter campaign, the 34-year-old renewed his link to the Che for a further two years.[5]

In December 2007 Cañizares, alongside teammates Miguel Ángel Angulo and David Albelda, was axed by new manager Ronald Koeman,[6] with all three players limited to training and unable to join another side in Spain, having already played four league games. In late April 2008, however, with Koeman's sacking, all three were reinstated by new manager Voro in a squad seriously threatened with relegation, with five remaining rounds; on 27 April 2008 Cañizares returned to action, as Timo Hildebrand and Juan Luis Mora were injured, in a 3–0 home win against CA Osasuna.[7]

On 18 May 2008, Cañizares agreed to end his contract with Valencia and leave the club. He played his final game with the side two days later against Atlético Madrid (3–1),[8] and was released the next day, retiring shortly after at almost 39 years of age, having appeared in exactly 500 league matches – both major levels combined – during exactly two decades.

International career[edit]

Cañizares was capped 46 times for Spain, the first in 17 November 1993: Zubizarreta was sent off in the tenth minute of a decisive 1994 FIFA World Cup qualifier against Denmark, and he made his debut in heroic fashion, keeping a clean sheet in the 1–0 home win and ensuring qualification at the expense of the Danes themselves.[9]

However, Cañizares was often second-choice, and only played five games in the major international scene: one in the 1994 World Cup (as Zubi served a one-match ban), three in UEFA Euro 2000 and one in the 2006 World Cup. He was also a squad member at Euro 1996, the 1998 World Cup and Euro 2004 but didn't play, blocked by Zubizarreta in the 1990s and Iker Casillas in 2004; he was equally an unused player in the gold winning squad at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona.

Cañizares' club form ensured himself as first-choice international in the 2002 World Cup, but he missed out on the tournament due to an accident with an aftershave bottle, which resulted in a severed tendon in his foot.[10]

Honours[edit]

Club[edit]

Real Madrid
Valencia

Country[edit]

Spain U16
Spain U23

Individual[edit]

Club statistics[edit]

Club Season League Cup Europe Other[11] Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Castilla 1989–90 35 0 ? ? - - - - ? ?
Total 35 0 ? ? 0 0 0 0 ? ?
Elche 1990–91 7 0 ? ? - - - - ? ?
Total 7 0 ? ? 0 0 0 0 ? ?
CP Mérida 1991–92 38 0 ? ? - - - - ? ?
Total 38 0 ? ? 0 0 0 0 ? ?
Celta 1992–93 36 0 ? ? - - - - ? ?
1993–94 38 0 ? ? - - - - ? ?
Total 74 0 ? ? 0 0 0 0 ? ?
Real Madrid 1994–95 1 0 0 0 2 0 - - 3 0
1995–96 12 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 15 0
1996–97 2 0 0 0 - - - - 2 0
1997–98 26 0 0 0 6 0 2 0 34 0
Total 41 0 1 0 9 0 3 0 54 0
Valencia 1998–99 38 0 6 0 10 0 - - 54 0
1999–2000 23 0 2 0 13 0 2 0 40 0
2000–01 37 0 0 0 18 0 - - 55 0
2001–02 32 0 1 0 8 0 - - 41 0
2002–03 31 0 0 0 13 0 2 0 46 0
2003–04 37 0 0 0 7 0 - - 44 0
2004–05 29 0 0 0 7 0 2 0 38 0
2005–06 36 0 0 0 5 0 - - 41 0
2006–07 32 0 1 0 11 0 - - 44 0
2007–08 10 0 0 0 5 0 - - 15 0
Total 305 0 10 0 97 0 6 0 418 0
Career total 500 0 ? ? 106 0 9 0 ? ?

[12]

Spain national team
Year Apps Goals
1993 1 0
1994 5 0
1995 2 0
1996 1 0
1997 0 0
1998 5 0
1999 7 0
2000 5 0
2001 6 0
2002 4 0
2003 3 0
2004 5 0
2005 0 0
2006 2 0
Total 46 0

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Villa gives Valencia leaving present". FIFA.com. 18 May 2008. Retrieved 23 July 2008. 
  2. ^ Peter Schmeichel's top Euro keepers; BBC
  3. ^ Cañizares – Entrevista exclusiva (Cañizares – Exclusive interview); Solo Porteros, 1 February 2007 (Spanish)
  4. ^ "Bayern crowned European champions". BBC Sport. 23 May 2001. Retrieved 16 January 2013. 
  5. ^ Cañizares commits to Valencia; UEFA.com, 26 July 2004
  6. ^ Koeman ratifica el despido de Albelda, Cañizares y Angulo (Koeman confirms Albelda, Cañizares and Angulo's sacking); La Vanguardia, 28 December 2007 (Spanish)
  7. ^ "Valencia 3–0 Osasuna". ESPN Soccernet. 27 April 2008. Retrieved 16 January 2013. 
  8. ^ "Valencia 3–1 Atlético Madrid". ESPN Soccernet. 18 May 2008. Retrieved 16 January 2013. 
  9. ^ Euro 2000 profile; BBC Sport
  10. ^ Canizares out of World Cup; BBC Sport, 17 May 2002
  11. ^ Includes other competitive competitions, including the Supercopa de España
  12. ^ José Santiago Cañizares Ruiz – International Appearances; at RSSSF

External links[edit]