Santos Acosta

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This name uses Spanish naming customs: the first or paternal family name is Acosta and the second or maternal family name is Castillo.
Santos Acosta
Manuel María de los Santos Acosta.jpg
6th President of the United States of Colombia
In office
May 23, 1867 – April 1, 1868
Preceded by Tomás Cipriano de Mosquera
Succeeded by Santos Gutiérrez
8th President of the Sovereign State of Boyacá
In office
1866–1868
Preceded by Sergio Camargo
Succeeded by Aníbal Correa
Personal details
Born Manuel María de los Santos Acosta Castillo
(1828-11-01)November 1, 1828
Miraflores, Boyacá, Colombia
Died January 9, 1901(1901-01-09) (aged 73)
Bogotá, Cundinamarca, Colombia
Nationality Colombian
Political party Liberal
Spouse(s) Carlota Larrota Castañeda
Alma mater Our Lady of the Rosary University
Occupation Physician, soldier (General), politician, rector
Profession Physician
Religion Roman Catholic
Military service
Allegiance Colombia (Liberal Party)
Service/branch National Army of Colombia
Years of service 1854-1876
Rank General
Commands Army Chief of Staff
Battles/wars Colombian Civil War of 1854
Colombian Civil War 1860–1862
Colombian Civil War of 1876

Manuel María de los Santos Acosta Castillo (1828–1901) was a Colombian General and political figure. He served as the president of Colombia from 1867 until 1868.

Biographic data[edit]

Acosta was born in Miraflores, Boyacá, on November 1, 1828. He died in Bogotá on January 9, 1901.[1]

Political career[edit]

Although Acosta studied and graduated in medicine, he did not practice this profession. Rather, he pursued military and political careers. He was elected several times as MP, both to the House of Representatives and the Senate. Santos Acosta was one of the main players during the constitutional reform of 1853.[1]

In 1867, Congress elected Acosta as second Vice-President. Congress had also elected Santos Gutiérrez as first Vice-President and Joaquín Riascos as third Vice-President.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Arismendi Posada, Ignacio; Gobernantes Colombianos; trans. Colombian Presidents; Interprint Editors Ltd., Italgraf, Segunda Edición; Page 81; Bogotá, Colombia; 1983

Sources[edit]