Santos Dumont Airport

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For the airport serving Paranaguá, Brazil, see Paranaguá Airport.
Santos Dumont Airport
Aeroporto Santos Dumont
Santos Dumont Airport.jpg
IATA: SDUICAO: SBRJ
Summary
Airport type Public/Military
Operator Infraero
Serves Rio de Janeiro
Hub for TAM Airlines
Gol Airlines
Azul Brazilian Airlines
Elevation AMSL 3 m / 11 ft
Coordinates 22°54′37″S 043°09′46″W / 22.91028°S 43.16278°W / -22.91028; -43.16278Coordinates: 22°54′37″S 043°09′46″W / 22.91028°S 43.16278°W / -22.91028; -43.16278
Website Infraero SDU
Map
SDU is located in Rio de Janeiro
SDU
SDU
Location within greater Rio de Janeiro
Runways
Direction Length Surface
m ft
02R/20L 1,323 4,341 Asphalt
02L/20R 1,260 4,200 Asphalt
Statistics (2013)
Passengers 9,204,603
Aircraft operations 127,328
Metric tonnes of cargo 8,828
Statistics: Infraero[1]
Sources: Airport Website,[2] ANAC[3]

Santos Dumont Airport (IATA: SDUICAO: SBRJ) is the second major airport serving Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. It is named after the Brazilian aviation pioneer Alberto Santos Dumont (1873–1932).

It is operated by Infraero.

Santos Dumont has slot restrictions operating with a maximum of 19 operations/hour, being one of the three airports with such restrictions in Brazil.[4]

History[edit]

Airbus A319 of TAM Airlines taking off on the short Santos Dumont runway.

Originally known as Calabouço Airport, the history of the airport can be traced back to the early 1930s. Until that time, the few aircraft equipped with landing gear used Manguinhos Airport. Seaplanes, which at the time operated the majority of domestic and international flights, used a terminal located at the Calabouço Point, an area known today as Praça Marechal Âncora. Take-off and landings were made using an area of Guanabara Bay then known as estirão do Caju (Caju water stretch). It was as a development of the terminal at Calabouço Point, that Calabouço Airport was created.[5]

A new public terminal building for seaplanes was inaugurated on 29 October 1938. It was a replacement for the original passenger terminal and was used by all airlines except Panair do Brasil and Pan American World Airways which used their own facilities. Due to the obsolescence of seaplanes, it ceased to be used in 1942. Today, this protected building houses the Historical and Cultural Institute of the Brazilian Air Force (INCAER).

In 1934, in order to handle a growing amount of land operations, land was reclaimed from the sea to create the first runway of the airport with a length of 1,300 feet (400 m). In 1936, the runway was extended to 2,300 feet (700 m) and on 30 November it received its first commercial flight, a VASP Junkers Ju 52 aircraft flying from São Paulo-Congonhas. The airport complex was officially inaugurated on 16 October 1936 and was named Santos Dumont Airport.

It was also in 1936 that the construction of a new passenger terminal began. It was a project led by the architects MMM Roberto (Marcelo, Milton and Mauricio Roberto Doria-Baptista) inspired in the Paris-Le Bourget Airport terminal. Its pioneering, modernist, architectural features created a Brazilian national landmark. It was only in 1947 that its construction was completed. This building continues to be used to the present day. In the lobby of this terminal, (presently the arrivals terminal) two monumental paintings by Cadmo Fausto de Sousa can be seen. Named "Old Aviation" and "Modern Aviation", they feature many old and new means of flying. Both were unveiled in 1951.[6]

Original terminal building. Currently handles only arrivals.

Adjoining the original seaplane terminal, Pan American World Airways and its Brazilian subsidiary Panair do Brasil constructed their own dedicated terminal for seaplanes and aircraft with landing gear. This terminal opened in 1937 featuring an architecture was inspired by the Pan American Seaplane Base and Terminal Building in Miami. It included not only a passenger terminal but also offices and hangars. It remained the headquarters of Panair do Brasil until the airline was forced to cease its operations in 1965. Presently, it headquarters the Third Regional Air Command of the Brazilian Air Force.

On 21 May 1959 a formal agreement between Varig, Cruzeiro do Sul, and VASP created an air shuttle service (Portuguese: Ponte Aérea), the first of its kind in the world. This service operated between Rio de Janeiro-Santos Dumont Airport and São Paulo-Congonhas and comprised regular hourly departures, common check-in counter, and simplified tickets and formalities. The service was an instant success. Transbrasil joined the partnership in 1968. Starting in 1975 the service was operated exclusively by Varig's Lockheed L-188 Electras. In 1999 this service came to an end because airlines decided to operate their own independent services.[7]

Over the years, the airport's main runway has been extended several times, first to 2,300 feet (700 m), then to 3,000 feet (910 m), and finally 4,340 feet (1,320 m).

With the gradual shift of international operations to Rio de Janeiro-Galeão Airport opened in 1952, Rio de Janeiro-Santos Dumont lost its place as an international hub, but for many years retained its position of a major hub for domestic traffic, particularly until 1960, when the capital of Brazil was moved to Brasília. Presently the airport handles only part of Rio's short to medium haul domestic air traffic as well as part of its general aviation and military operations. The airport is famous for having some of the shortest runways on which some Boeing and Airbus aircraft can land. An idea of these operations is given in the 007–James Bond film Moonraker of 1979, in which a Lockheed L-188 Electra briefly appears taking-off from the airport.

The new terminal building opened in 2007 and handles all departures.

Due to a fire that almost destroyed the main terminal in 1999, the passenger terminal building was closed for 6 months.

On 26 May 2007, in time for the 2007 Pan American Games, a brand-new, modern extension of the original terminal was opened. This extension handles all departure operations, whilst the original terminal now handles all arrival operations. The new departures terminal increased the total capacity of the airport to 8.0 million passengers/year.

It was announced on 5 August 2009 that in order to renew its operational licence the Rio de Janeiro State Environment Institute – INEA would require Santos Dumont Airport to adjust operational standards. After a meeting between INEA and Infraero held on 3 September 2009, the following compromise was reached: approach route 2 is used only when specific wind conditions that amount to 30% of total operations so require; the airport is closed between 23:00 and 06:00 hours: aircraft may depart or arrive until 22:30 hours, giving a half hour tolerance period; and the maximum amount of flights per hour was reduced from 23 to 19.[8][9]

Airlines and destinations[edit]

Aerial view of Santos Dumont location. The Rio-Niterói Bridge in the background, and the Sugar Loaf (Pão de Açúcar) in the foreground.
Airlines Destinations
Avianca Brazil Belo Horizonte-Confins, Brasília, Salvador da Bahia, São Paulo-Congonhas
Azul Brazilian Airlines Campinas, Campo Grande, Campos dos Goytacazes, Cuiabá, Curitiba, Goiânia, Joinville, Londrina, Macaé, Manaus, Maringá, Navegantes, Porto Alegre, Recife, São José do Rio Preto, São José dos Campos, São Paulo-Congonhas, São Paulo-Guarulhos, Vitória
Gol Airlines Belo Horizonte-Confins, Brasília, Campinas, Juazeiro do Norte, Recife, Salvador da Bahia, São Paulo-Congonhas, São Paulo-Guarulhos, Uberlândia, Vitória
TAM Airlines Aracaju, Belo Horizonte-Confins, Brasília, São Paulo-Congonhas, Vitória

Accidents and incidents[edit]

Major accidents involving fatalities[edit]

Incidents[edit]

Access[edit]

parking tarmac and control tower, Santos Dumont Airport

The airport is located adjacent to downtown Rio de Janeiro.

There are taxis available.

Real Auto Ônibus operates executive bus 2018, that runs half-hourly from the airport to the Central Bus Station and Galeão International Airport in one direction, and in the opposite direction to the southern parts of the city along the shore, with its final stop at Alvorada Bus Terminal in Barra da Tijuca. Bus 2145 is an express link between Santos Dumont and Galeão Airports and bus 2101 stops at the Central Bus Station. They run every 20 minutes. All services are provided between 05:30 and 22:30 hours.[47]

Bus 016 is a circular service between Santos Dumont Airport and downtown area, particularly Cinelândia Subway station.

All these bus services have their stops in front of the arrivals terminal and tickets can be bought in the bus while boarding.

Future developments[edit]

On 31 August 2009, Infraero unveiled a BRL152.2 million (USD80.2 million; EUR64.5 million) investment plan[48] to upgrade Santos Dumont Airport, particularly the passenger arrivals terminal. The plan focuses on the preparations for the 2014 FIFA World Cup which will be held in Brazil, Rio de Janeiro being one of the venue cities, and the 2016 Summer Olympics, which Rio de Janeiro will host. The renovation is expected to be completed in November 2011.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

  1. ^ "Movimento operacional da rede Infraero de janeiro a dezembro de 2013" (in Portuguese). Infraero. 4 February 2014. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  2. ^ "Airport Official Website" (in Portuguese). Infraero. 
  3. ^ "Lista de aeródromos públicos" (in Portuguese). ANAC. 
  4. ^ "Nota técnica" (in Portuguese). ANAC. Retrieved 12 September 2011. 
  5. ^ Empresa das Artes (ed.) (1996). Aeroporto Santos Dumont 1936–1996 (in Portuguese). Rio de Janeiro: Empresa das Artes. ISBN 85-85628-27-8. 
  6. ^ Pereira, Aldo (1987). Breve história da aviação comercial brasileira (in Portuguese). Rio de Janeiro: Europa Empresa Gráfica e Editora. 
  7. ^ "Ponte Aérea completa meio século". Revista da Associação dos tripulantes da TAM. 2009. pp. 2–3. 
  8. ^ "Restrições obrigam aeroporto Santos Dumont a alterar rota" (in Portuguese). INEA. 4 August 2009. Retrieved 13 September 2011. 
  9. ^ "Licença ambiental vai restringir operações no Aeroporto Santos Dumont" (in Portuguese). Agência Brasil. 4 August 2009. Retrieved 13 September 2009. 
  10. ^ Pereira, Aldo (1987). Breve história da aviação comercial brasileira (in Portuguese). Rio de Janeiro: Europa Empresa Gráfica e Editora. p. 130. 
  11. ^ a b c Pereira, Aldo (1987). Breve história da aviação comercial brasileira (in Portuguese). Rio de Janeiro: Europa Empresa Gráfica e Editora. p. 131. 
  12. ^ "Accident description PP-SPF". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  13. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Vizinhança perigosa". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 33–36. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  14. ^ Pereira, Aldo (1987). Breve História da Aviação Comercial Brasileira (in Portuguese). Rio de Janeiro: Europa. p. 338. 
  15. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Uma desgraça nunca vem só". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 49–53. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  16. ^ "Accident description PP-SPD". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 17 August 2011. 
  17. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Colisão com a Escola Naval". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 54–60. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  18. ^ "Accident description PP-PCH". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 16 May 2011. 
  19. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "O gigante Adamastor". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 73–82. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  20. ^ "Accident description PP-CDJ". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 18 August 2011. 
  21. ^ "Accident description PP-CBY". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 10 September 2011. 
  22. ^ "Accident description PP-ANX". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 17 August 2011. 
  23. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Ilha Anchieta". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 159–161. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  24. ^ "Accident description PP-LEM". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 10 September 2011. 
  25. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "O senhor do céu". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 162–164. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  26. ^ "Accident description PP-BTB". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 10 September 2011. 
  27. ^ "Accident description PP-SQE". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 17 August 2011. 
  28. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Ponte aérea das doze horas". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 171–173. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  29. ^ "Accident description 131582". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 11 May 2011. 
  30. ^ "Accident description PP-AXD". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 23 September 2011. 
  31. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Torre de Babel". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 182–186. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  32. ^ "Accident description PP-YRB". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 16 May 2011. 
  33. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "O mistério da ilha dos Ferros". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 190–193. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  34. ^ "Accident description PP-SRA and PT-BRQ". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 2 June 2011. 
  35. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "No céu de Paraibuna". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 214–216. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  36. ^ "Accident description PP-SRR". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 16 July 2011. 
  37. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "A montanha trágica". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 243–248. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  38. ^ "Accident description PP-SMI". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 18 August 2011. 
  39. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "O Samurai desaparecido". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 274–278. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  40. ^ "Accident description PP-SMJ". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 16 May 2011. 
  41. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Dia do aviador". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 291–293. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  42. ^ "Accident description PT-WLX". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 26 July 2011. 
  43. ^ "Accident description PT-FSE". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 4 August 2011. 
  44. ^ "Incident description PP-PCR". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 12 September 2011. 
  45. ^ "Incident description PP-SRM". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 11 September 2009. 
  46. ^ "Incident description FAB2100". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 2 September 2009. 
  47. ^ "Nossas Linhas: Premium" (in Portuguese). Real Auto Ônibus. Retrieved 22 September 2010. 
  48. ^ Rittner, Daniel; Braga, Paulo Victor (31 August 2009). "Infraero vai gastar R$5 bi em reforma de aeroportos". Valor Econômico (in Portuguese). pp. A4. 

External links[edit]