Sarah Harris Fayerweather

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Sarah Harris Fayerweather (1812–1878) was an African-American activist who worked for abolitionism in Kingston, Rhode Island. As a young woman, she attended Prudence Crandall's school in Canterbury, Connecticut, considered to be the first integrated schoolhouse in the United States.

Early life and education[edit]

Sarah Harris was born 16 April 1812 in Norwich, Connecticut. In 1832 as an aspiring teacher, she enrolled in Prudence Crandall's school in Canterbury, Connecticut, considered to be the first integrated schoolhouse in America.[1] The following year, the school was forcibly closed under the notorious Connecticut Black Law of 1833.[2]

In 1833, she married George Fayerweather, a blacksmith of Narragansett and African descent; his father's ancestors were slaves. They moved to live in New Haven for several years.[3] They later lived in Kingston, Rhode Island at the Fayerweather homestead, where she took up the cause of anti-slavery and abolitionism, which her husband also supported.

Sarah Fayerweather died on 16 November 1878 in Kingston and was buried at the local Old Fernwood Cemetery.[4]

Legacy and Honors[edit]

In 1970 Fayerweather Hall, a dormitory on the campus of University of Rhode Island, was named for Sarah Harris Fayerweather.[5] [6]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wormley, G. Smith."Prudence Crandall", The Journal of Negro History Vol. 8, No. 1, Jan. 1923.
  2. ^ "Black Law of 1833". Yale University. Retrieved 29 December 2011. 
  3. ^ "Sarah Harris Fayerweather". African American Resource Center. Retrieved 28 December 2011. .
  4. ^ "Fayerweather House". Kingston Improvement Association, Kingston, Rhode Island. Retrieved 28 December 2011. 
  5. ^ "University of Rhode Island History and Timeline". University of Rhode Island. Retrieved 28 December 2011. 
  6. ^ "URI RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX". University of Rhode Island. Retrieved 18 July 2013.