Saskatchewan Liberal Party leadership elections

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This page shows the results of leadership elections in the Saskatchewan Liberal Party, covering the period from 1905 to the present day. All leadership contests in the Saskatchewan Liberal Party have been determined by delegated conventions.

Liberal leadership convention, 1905[edit]

(Held on August 16, 1905.)

(Note: this convention was held a few weeks before Saskatchewan was officially proclaimed as a Canadian province.)

Developments, 1905-1926[edit]

Walter Scott resigned as premier and party leader in 1916, and was replaced by William M. Martin on October 20 of that year. Martin was selected by the Liberal parliamentary caucus; it is assumed that he was subsequently confirmed without opposition at a provincial Liberal convention.

Martin, in turn, resigned in 1922, and was replaced by Charles A. Dunning on April 5 of that year. Dunning, like Martin, was chosen by caucus; it is also assumed that he was later confirmed without opposition by the party.

Liberal leadership convention, 1926[edit]

(Held on February 25, 1926.)

(Note: A.P. McNab, S.J. Latta and C.M. Hamilton were also nominated at the convention, but all three withdrew to make the choice of Gardiner unanimous.)

Developments, 1926-1946[edit]

Gardiner resigned as Premier and party leader in 1935 to enter the federal cabinet of W.L.M. King. On October 31, 1935, William John Patterson was the unanimous choice of the provincial Liberal council to take his before. It is assumed that Patterson was approved without opposition at a subsequent party convention.

Liberal leadership convention, 1946[edit]

(Held on August 6, 1946.)

Liberal leadership convention, 1954[edit]

(Held on November 26, 1954.)

Liberal leadership convention, 1959[edit]

(Held on September 24, 1959.)

(Note: The vote totals were not released, although it is believed that Thatcher won with about 67% support on the first ballot.)

Liberal leadership convention, 1971[edit]

(Held on December 11, 1971.)

First ballot:

Second ballot:

Liberal leadership convention, 1976[edit]

(Held on December 11, 1976.)

Liberal leadership convention, 1981[edit]

(Held on June 13, 1981.)

Liberal leadership convention, 1989[edit]

(Held on April 2, 1989.)

(Note: The results were not announced, but it is believed that Haverstock won by a significant majority on the first ballot.)

Liberal leadership convention, 1996[edit]

(Held on November 24, 1996.)

First ballot:

Second ballot:

Third ballot:

Liberal leadership convention, 2001[edit]

(Held on October 27, 2001.)

Liberal leadership convention, 2009[edit]

Ryan Bater' acclaimed[1][broken citation]

References[edit]