Saul Winstein

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Saul Winstein
Born (1912-10-08)October 8, 1912
Died November 23, 1969(1969-11-23) (aged 57)
Nationality Canadian
Fields Physical Organic Chemistry
Institutions UCLA
Known for Winstein reaction
Grunwald-Winstein equation
Non-classical cation
Anchimeric assistance

Saul Winstein (October 8, 1912 – November 23, 1969) was the Canadian chemist who discovered the Winstein reaction, in which he argued a non-classical cation was needed to explain the stability of the norbornyl cation. This fueled a debate with Herbert C. Brown over the existence of delocalized cations such as this. Richard F. Heck, who earlier in his career had undertaken postgraduate studies with Winstein, won the 2010 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.[1] Co-author of the Grunwald-Winstein equation concerning solvolysis rates.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nobel Foundation description of the non-classical ion and its importance, and the debate over their existence.
  2. ^ W. G. Young, D. J. Cram (1951). "The Correlation of Solvolysis Rates and the Classification of Solvolysis Reactions Into Mechanistic Categories". Journal of the American Chemical Society 73 (6): 2700–2707. doi:10.1021/ja01150a078. 

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