Sausalito Marin City School District

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Sausalito Marin City School District
Address
630 Nevada Street
Sausalito, California 94965
Information
School type Public, elementary school district
Motto Building Tomorrow Today
School board Mark Trotter (2006–10)
Whitney S. Hoyt (2005–10)
Shirley Thornton (1998–2010)
Thomas Clark (2002–08)
Elizabeth Todd-Gallardo (2006–08)
Superintendent Debra Bradley
School number NCES: 0636000 State: 2165474
Staff 44.0
Grades K-8
Enrollment 263 (2004-05)
Kindergarten 37
Grade 1 33
Grade 2 27
Grade 3 23
Grade 4 31
Grade 5 32
Grade 6 22
Grade 7 33
Grade 8 25
Language English
Campus Urban Fringe of Large City / 3
Area Marin County, California
Communities served Sausalito and Marin City
Website
Sausalito Marin City School District Information
at the National Center for Education Statistics

Sausalito Marin City School District (SMCSD) is a public school district with offices in Sausalito, California, United States. The district serves Sausalito and the unincorporated area of Marin City in Marin County. As of the 2004-05 school year, the District had 263 students at its three schools.

History[edit]

During much of the district's history, the demographics were evenly split between White students and African-American students. Most of the military families from nearby bases, who were mostly White, sent their children to Sausalito public schools. After the Cold War ended, the United States Department of Defense closed Fort Baker, Fort Berry, and the Presidio of San Francisco. Over 100 students left the school in one period after the military transfers. By then, many families in Sausalito were sending children to private schools instead of public schools. By 1996 80% of the students were African American, and most of the district's students were poor. Despite the district's high student spending and small class sizes, test scores were low.[1]

In 1997 the Marin County Civil Grand Jury published a report indicating that, despite the ample funding, the district had poor performance and violence.[2]

In 2006 Jennifer Gollan and Don Speich of the Marin Independent Journal said "Poor academic achievement in the Sausalito Marin City School District has rendered the concept of public neighborhood schools largely meaningless as dozens of children in the district, both black and white, flock to private schools."[3]

A 2008 followup to the county report indicated improvements and suggested that the Bayside and Martin Luther King schools be returned to K-8 configurations.[2]

In 2011 Rob Rogers of the Marin Independent Journal said that the district continually had, of all of the Marin County school districts, the lowest test scores. The University of Southern California's Rossier School of Education named Willow Creek Academy one of the top charter schools in California.[4]

On Thursday January 21, 2014, the board voted to make the Marin City school a K-8 and to close Bayside, having its buildings be used by the Willow Creek charter school, which will use the Bayside campus to house three additional classrooms.[5] The consolidation of Bayside into MLK will be in effect in the northern hemisphere fall of 2013.[6]

Staff[edit]

The District had 19.0 full-time-equivalent classroom teachers (2.0 kindergarten and 17.0 elementary). The other 25.0 staff included 11.5 instructional aides or coordinators, 8 district and school administrators, and 5.5 support staff. There were no guidance counselors or library staff.

Fiscal[edit]

The District budget as of 2004-05 was $5,333,000, or $17,203 per student. Revenue sources were 6% federal, 81% local, and 13% state.

School Buildings Improvement Bond[edit]

On November 2, 2004, District voters approved Measure I, the School Improvement Bond of 2004, a $15.9 million bond measure that authorizes funding for repairs, upgrades, and new construction projects to the three schools in the District.

The District contracted with the Professional Projects Advisory Group, VBN Architects and Turner Construction to prepare a detailed timeline and budget for construction.[7]

Community demographics[edit]

In 2000, the attendance area had a total population under age 18 of 1,265, of which 101 (8.0%) were Hispanic.[8]

The racial composition was

  • White alone: 618 (48.9%)
  • Black or African American alone: 395 (31.2%)
  • American Indian or Alaska Native alone: 8 (0.6%)
  • Asian alone: 79 (6.2%)
  • Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander alone: 2 (0.2%)
  • Some other race alone: 55 (4.3%)
  • Population of two or more races: 108 (8.5%)

Schools[edit]

Bayside Elementary School
Address
630 Nevada Street
Sausalito, California 94965
Information
School type Public, elementary school
Principal Cherisse C. Baatin
Grades K-6
Enrollment 106 (2004-05)
Kindergarten 17
Grade 1 15
Grade 2 11
Grade 3 10
Grade 4 15
Grade 5 22
Grade 6 16
Language English
Website
Bayside Elementary School Information
at the National Center for Education Statistics

Bayside Elementary School[edit]

Bayside Elementary School has an enrollment of 106 students in kindergarten through sixth grade. With 9.0 full-time-equivalent teachers, Bayside has a student-teacher ratio of 11.8. The campus is located in the urban fringe of a large city. Bayside is neither a charter or magnet school.

Student demographics
The majority of the students are Black or African American. Enrollment by race or ethnicity and by gender are as follows:

  • Amererican Indian/Alaskan: 6 (5.7%)
  • Asian: 0 (0%)
  • Black: 79 (74.5%)
  • Hispanic: 15 (14.2%)
  • White: 6 (5.7%)
  • Male: 54 (50.9%)
  • Female: 52 (49.1%)

Bayside is a Title I School, with a School-Wide Program.[9] The majority of the students are eligible for subsidized meals: 74.5% for free lunch and 7.5% for reduced-price lunch. There are no migrant students.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Academy
Address
620 Drake Avenue
Marin City, California 94965
Information
School type Public, junior high school
Principal Cherisse C. Baatin
Grades 7–8
Enrollment 51 (2004-05)
Grade 7 26
Grade 8 25
Language English
Feeder schools Bayside Elementary School
Website
Martin Luther King, Jr. Academy Information
at the National Center for Education Statistics

Martin Luther King, Jr. Academy[edit]

Martin Luther King, Jr. Academy has an enrollment of 51 students in seventh and eighth grades. With 3.0 full-time-equivalent teachers, Martin Luther King, Jr. has a student-teacher ratio of 17.0. The campus is located in the urban fringe of a large city. Martin Luther King, Jr.is neither a charter or magnet school.

Student demographics
The majority of the students are Black or African American. Enrollment by race or ethnicity and by gender are as follows:

  • Amererican Indian/Alaskan: 0 (0.0%)
  • Asian: 1 (2.0%)
  • Black: 40 (78.4%)
  • Hispanic: 5 (9.8%)
  • White: 4 (7.8%)
  • Male: 24 (47.1%)
  • Female: 26 (52.9%)

Martin Luther King, Jr.is a Title I School, with a School-Wide Program. The majority of the students are eligible for subsidized meals: 92.% for free lunch or reduced-price lunch. There are no migrant students.

Willow Creek Academy[edit]

(See article on Willow Creek Academy.)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ La Ganga, Maria L. "COLUMN ONE; Sausalito Schools: Money Isn't Enough; A wealthy district struggles to teach some of its poorest students, creating an education enigma. Underachievement ignites a firestorm of protest from frustrated parents." Los Angeles Times. May 16, 1997. Part A Metro Desk Page 1. Retrieved on July 4, 2011.
  2. ^ a b "The Sausalito Marin City School District." Marin County. June 26, 2008. Retrieved on January 3, 2009.
  3. ^ Gollan, Jennifer and Don Speich. "Public school exodus." Marin Independent Journal. June 12, 2006. Retrieved on July 4, 2011.
  4. ^ Rogers, Rob. "Willow Creek in Sausalito named one of state's top charter schools." Marin Independent Journal. June 16, 2011. Retrieved on July 4, 2011.
  5. ^ Prado, Mark. "Board vote will result in closure of Bayside School in Sausalito." Marin Independent Journal. January 24, 2013. Retrieved on February 3, 2013.
  6. ^ "K-8 Comprehensive Education Program." (Archive) Sausalito Marin City School District. Retrieved on February 3, 2013.
  7. ^ Sausalito Marin City School District, accessed 2007-02-26
  8. ^ NCES Census information from the United States Census 2000
  9. ^ Title I School-Wide Program: NCES term for "a school in which all the pupils in a school are designated under appropriate state and federal regulations as being eligible for participation in programs authorized by Title I."

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 37°51′50″N 122°30′04″W / 37.863894°N 122.500992°W / 37.863894; -122.500992