Savikalpa

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Savikalpa samādhi (Sanskrit: सविकल्पसमाधि) is a state of samādhi in which one's consciousness temporarily dissolves into Brahman.

In this state, one lets go of the ego and becomes aware of Spirit beyond creation. The soul is then able to absorb the fire of Spirit-Wisdom that "roasts" or destroys the seeds of body-bound inclinations. The soul as the meditator, its state of meditation, and the Spirit as the object of meditation all become one. The separate wave of the soul meditating in the ocean of Spirit becomes merged with the Spirit. The soul does not lose its identity, but only expands into Spirit. In savikalpa samadhi the mind is conscious only of the Spirit within; it is not conscious of the exterior world. The body is in a trancelike state, but the consciousness is fully perceptive of its blissful experience within.[1]

Beyond the state of savikalpa are the more immersive and lasting samadhi states of nirvikalpa and sahaja.

Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell, founder of the Institute of Noetic Sciences, has compared the experience of seeing the earth from space, also known as the overview effect, to savikalpa samadhi.[2]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Yogananda, Paramahansa: God Talks with Arjuna, The Bhagavad Gita, An new translation and commentary, Self-Realization Fellowship 2001, ISBN 0-87612-031-1 (paperback) ISBN 0-87612-030-3 (hardcover), I,10.
  2. ^ Overview. Planetary Collective, Vimeo.