Sayreville, New Jersey

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Sayreville, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Sayreville
Location of Sayreville in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County in New Jersey.
Location of Sayreville in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Sayreville, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Sayreville, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°28′02″N 74°19′10″W / 40.467357°N 74.319351°W / 40.467357; -74.319351Coordinates: 40°28′02″N 74°19′10″W / 40.467357°N 74.319351°W / 40.467357; -74.319351[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Middlesex
Incorporated April 6, 1876 (as township)
April 29, 1919 (as borough)
Named for James R. Sayre, Jr.
Government[7]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Kennedy O'Brien (term ends December 31, 2015)[3][4]
 • Administrator Jeff Bertrand[5]
 • Clerk Theresa Farbaniec[6]
Area[2]
 • Total 18.704 sq mi (48.442 km2)
 • Land 15.842 sq mi (41.030 km2)
 • Water 2.862 sq mi (7.412 km2)  15.30%
Area rank 154th of 566 in state
8th of 25 in county[2]
Elevation[8] 10 ft (3 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 42,704
 • Estimate (2012[12]) 43,761
 • Rank 47th of 566 in state
9th of 25 in county[13]
 • Density 2,695.7/sq mi (1,040.8/km2)
 • Density rank 233rd of 566 in state
18th of 25 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08871-08872[14][15]
Area code(s) 732[16]
FIPS code 342365790[17][2][18]
GNIS feature ID 0885386[19][2]
Website www.sayreville.com

Sayreville is a borough located on the Raritan River, near Raritan Bay in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 42,704,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 2,327 (+5.8%) from the 40,377 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 5,391 (+15.4%) from the 34,986 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Sayreville was originally incorporated as a township on April 6, 1876, from portions of South Amboy Township. On April 2, 1919, the borough was reincorporated as the Borough of Sayreville based on the results of a referendum held on April 29, 1919.[21]

Geography[edit]

Sayreville is located at 40°28′02″N 74°19′10″W / 40.467357°N 74.319351°W / 40.467357; -74.319351 (40.467357,-74.319351). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 18.704 square miles (48.442 km2), of which, 15.842 square miles (41.030 km2) of it is land and 2.862 square miles (7.412 km2) of it (15.30%) is water.[1][2]

The borough is located on the southern bank of the Raritan River, bordered on the southwest by and the south by Old Bridge Township. Low-lying areas near the river are subject to flooding associated with tidal surges.[22] The borough is approximately 24 miles (39 km) southwest of Lower Manhattan, 5 miles (8.0 km) southwest of Staten Island and 50 miles (80 km) northeast of Philadelphia. Area codes 732 and 848 and Area code 908 are used in Sayreville.

Sayreville uses four ZIP codes. 08871 and 08872 are post offices located in the borough itself. 08879 is the South Amboy ZIP code serving the Morgan and Melrose sections of Sayreville, the City of South Amboy, and the Laurence Harbor neighborhood of Old Bridge Township. 08859 is the Parlin ZIP code, which serves Sayreville and Old Bridge Township.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 1,930
1890 3,509 81.8%
1900 4,155 18.4%
1910 5,783 39.2%
1920 7,181 24.2%
1930 8,658 20.6%
1940 8,186 −5.5%
1950 10,338 26.3%
1960 22,553 118.2%
1970 32,508 44.1%
1980 29,969 −7.8%
1990 34,986 16.7%
2000 40,377 15.4%
2010 42,704 5.8%
Est. 2012 43,761 [12] 2.5%
Population sources: 1880-1920[23]
1880-1890[24] 1890-1910[25]
1910-1930[26] 1930-1990[27]
2000[28][29] 2010[9][10][11]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 42,704 people, 15,636 households, and 11,414 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,695.7 per square mile (1,040.8 /km2). There were 16,393 housing units at an average density of 1,034.8 per square mile (399.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 67.04% (28,630) White, 10.71% (4,573) Black or African American, 0.23% (100) Native American, 16.12% (6,882) Asian, 0.04% (18) Pacific Islander, 3.50% (1,495) from other races, and 2.36% (1,006) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 12.31% (5,258) of the population.[9]

There were 15,636 households of which 33.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.7% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.0% were non-families. 22.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.22.[9]

In the borough, 22.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 29.0% from 25 to 44, 28.3% from 45 to 64, and 12.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.6 years. For every 100 females there were 95.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.4 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $71,808 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,796) and the median family income was $84,929 (+/- $6,096). Males had a median income of $63,523 (+/- $3,061) versus $46,180 (+/- $3,434) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $32,259 (+/- $1,187). About 4.4% of families and 5.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.2% of those under age 18 and 4.6% of those age 65 or over.[30]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 40,377 people, 14,955 households, and 10,917 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,539.4 people per square mile (980.5/km2). There were 15,235 housing units at an average density of 958.1 per square mile (370.0/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 76.47% White, 8.62% African American, 0.13% Native American, 10.56% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 2.12% from other races, and 2.08% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.29% of the population.[28][29]

There were 14,955 households out of which 34.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.5% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.0% were non-families. 22.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.17.[28][29]

In the borough the population was spread out with 23.6% under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 34.2% from 25 to 44, 22.5% from 45 to 64, and 12.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 96.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.0 males.[28][29]

The median income for a household in the borough was $58,919, and the median income for a family was $66,266. Males had a median income of $47,427 versus $35,151 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $24,736. About 3.4% of families and 4.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.1% of those under age 18 and 5.3% of those age 65 or over.[28][29]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Sayreville is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a six-member Borough Council, with all positions elected at large in partisan elections. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. Members of the Borough Council are elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[7]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Sayreville is Kennedy O'Brien, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015.[31] Members of the Borough Council are Council President Daniel Buchanan (2013), Lisa Eicher (2014), William J. Henry (2013), David McGill (2015), Ricci Melendez (2015) and Mary J. Novak (2014).[32]

Emergency services[edit]

Sayreville's EMS-Rescue System is operated by an all-volunteer membership. The Sayreville Emergency Squad was founded in 1936 and provides EMS-Rescue Service with its sister Squad, Morgan First Aid. Both squads provide Emergency medical services, Motor Vehicle Extrication, Boat and Water Rescue, Search and Rescue, and any other rescue function needed. As one of the only completely volunteer first aid squads remaining in central New Jersey, they provide these services free to the citizens of Sayreville. The Sayreville Emergency Squad has been offering rescue services to the Borough since its formation in 1936 and has had a dedicated extrication crash truck as early as the 1940s.[33]

Sayreville also has an all-volunteer fire department. It has four fire companies, Sayreville Engine Company #1, Melrose Hose Company #1, Morgan Hose & Chemical Company #1, and the President Park Volunteer Fire Company.[34]

Sayreville operates an all-volunteer auxiliary police, which assists the police department with night patrols, Sunday church crossings and various borough events. They are also called into action in the event of large-scale borough emergencies where the police department is stressed for manpower.[35]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Sayreville is located in the 6th Congressional District[36] and is part of New Jersey's 19th state legislative district.[10][37][38]

New Jersey's Sixth Congressional District is represented by Frank Pallone (D, Long Branch).[39] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[40][41] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[42][43]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 19th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Joseph Vitale (D, Woodbridge Township) and in the General Assembly by Craig Coughlin (D, Woodbridge Township) and John Wisniewski (D, Sayreville).[44][45] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[46] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[47]

Middlesex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members are elected at-large to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in January, the board selects from among its members a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director. As of 2014, Middlesex County's Freeholders (with committee chairmanship, party affiliation, residence and term-end year listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Ronald G. Rios (Ex-officio on all committees - D, term ends December 31, 2015; Carteret),[48] Freeholder Deputy Director Carol Barrett Bellante (County Administration - D, 2014; Monmouth Junction, South Brunswick Township),[49] Kenneth Armwood (Business Development and Education - D, 2016; Piscataway),[50] Charles Kenny (Finance - D, 2016; Woodbridge Township),[51] H. James Polos (Public Safety and Health - D, 2015; Highland Park),[52] Charles E. Tomaro (Infrastructure Management - D, 2014; Edison)[53] and Blanquita B. Valenti (Community Services - D, 2016; New Brunswick).[54][55][56][57][58] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Elaine M. Flynn (D; Old Bridge Township),[59] Sheriff Mildred S. Scott (D, 2016; Piscataway)[60] and Surrogate Kevin J. Hoagland (D, 2017; New Brunswick).[55][61]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 24,248 registered voters in Sayerville, of which 9,394 (38.7%) were registered as Democrats, 2,778 (11.5%) were registered as Republicans and 12,053 (49.7%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 23 voters registered to other parties.[62]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 53.3% of the vote here (9,392 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 44.5% (7,839 votes) and other candidates with 1.3% (228 votes), among the 17,608 ballots cast by the borough's 24,673 registered voters, for a turnout of 71.4%.[63] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 51.0% of the vote here (8,147 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 47.7% (7,614 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (144 votes), among the 15,963 ballots cast by the borough's 22,510 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 70.9.[64]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 52.9% of the vote here (5,952 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 37.9% (4,263 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.8% (766 votes) and other candidates with 1.3% (148 votes), among the 11,242 ballots cast by the borough's 24,033 registered voters, yielding a 46.8% turnout.[65]

Education[edit]

The Sayreville Public Schools serve students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[66]) are four K-3 elementary schools — Emma Arleth Elementary School[67] (476 students), Dwight D. Eisenhower Elementary School[68] (546), Harry S. Truman Elementary School[69] (509) and Woodrow Wilson Elementary School[70] (358) — Sayreville Upper Elementary School[71] for grades 4&5 (977), Sayreville Middle School[72] for grades 6-8 (1,323), and Sayreville War Memorial High School[73] for grades 9-12 (1,734), while Jesse Selover Elementary School[74] offers a half-day program for children ages 3 to 5 years with mild to moderate disabilities, and a full-day program for children of the same age with moderate disabilities who require a greater degree of time and attention.[75][76]

History[edit]

Native Americans were the first settlers of Sayreville. Tribes of the Navesink lived along the South River where Jernee Mill Road is located today. This was noted on a 1656 New Jersey map by A. Vanderdonck, a Dutch surveyor and map maker. During the 20th century, amateur archaeologists found thousands of Indian artifacts at the location shown on the map.[77]

Predating the incorporation of Sayreville in 1703, the Morgan Inn - later known as the Old Spye Inn - was established in what is now the Morgan section of Sayreville. Charles Morgan III and his descendants, including James Morgan (congressman), Lt. Nicholas Morgan, and Major General James Morgan, played significant roles in the Revolutionary War. The Morgan family lived in the area for over 200 years and many family members are buried in the privately owned Morgan Cemetery, which overlooks Raritan Bay. The Morgans were said to be related to the famous pirate, Captain Henry Morgan, who is said to have visited the Inn on more than one occasion.[78][79][80]

It was during the Revolutionary War that the Morgan Inn gained its new name, the Old Spye Inn, according to local legends. A local British loyalist, Abe Mussey, was captured by Continental Army troops in 1777 while signaling to British ships in Raritan Bay. He was tried as a spy at the Inn, convicted in one-day trial and sentenced to death by hanging. Mussey's execution was carried out using a tree near the Inn's entrance. Mussey was reported to be buried behind the inn in an unmarked grave. The Inn was destroyed by fire in the late 20th century, but its ruins remain on the National Register of Historic Places.[81]

Originally known as Roundabout (for the river bends in the area) and then as Wood's Landing, it was renamed in the 1870s for James R. Sayre, Jr. of Newark, co-owner of Sayre & Fisher Brick Company, one of the many companies that took advantage of the extensive clay deposits supported the brick industry from the early 19th century until 1970. From its inception, Sayre and Fisher Brick Company quickly grew into one of the top brick making companies in Middlesex County. Brick production grew from 54 million bricks annually in 1878, to 178 million bricks in 1913. Company representatives in 1950 had estimated that more than six billion bricks had been produced since the founding of the company.[82]

In 1898, DuPont began production of gunpowder at its plant on Washington Road.[83] The company later built additional facilities in Sayreville for the production of paint and photo products.

At one time the Raritan River Railroad passed through Sayreville and had several spurs to service Sayre & Fisher and other local industries, with a train running on the line featured in a 1914 episode titled "The Juggernaut" of the silent movie serial The Perils of Pauline.[84] The episode was staged on the line, including the construction of a bridge over Ducks Nest Pond in Sayreville. The pond is located in the back of Bailey Park, which is found on South Minisink. The pond is available for fishing but may no longer used for swimming (since 1978). Sayreville residents can use the park, by permit, for picnics and camping. The park is located near the DuPont and Hercules factories.

Redevelopment[edit]

Although the borough remains an industrial community, the addition of many technology companies and a growing residential population has changed the landscape of this central New Jersey town.

Randy Corman, Executive Director of the Sayreville Economic and Redevelopment Agency (SERA), has been heading up the development of the parcel of land commonly referred to as the National Lead Site / Amboy Cinemas lot since about 2000. This new development would clear woods, trees, and wetlands and install an entire city complete with commercial, industrial, residential, and recreational facilities, all near the Middlesex County Utilities Authority (Sewerage Authority) and the Middlesex County Fire Academy.[85] There has also been much litigation as to the makeup of the members and public opinion about this project has never been put to a ballot.[86] In addition, closed door meetings have been accused of going against the Sunshine Open Meeting Act.[87]

As of 2012, the master plan of the area has been finalized to create a mixed use development which includes a shopping center, luxury mall, apartments, town homes, offices, and multiple marinas. Phase 1 of the plan has begun construction as of 2013. The first major tenant, Bass Pro Shops, will have a store open at the location in late 2014, as part of The Landing, which represents the first phase of The Point development.[88] It is known as Luxury Point, and is currently proceeding with land development, beginning major construction in Spring 2013. Plans include a luxury mall with 1,200,000 square feet (110,000 m2) of space, 620,000 square feet (58,000 m2) of luxury shopping, entertainment, restaurants and groceries, a 200,000 square feet (19,000 m2) Bass Pro Shops, a 700,000 square feet (65,000 m2) regional power center, 1,400 apartments and 600 homes, along with waterfront dining, hotels and office space.[citation needed]

Flood plain[edit]

Following extensive flooding near the river during Hurricane Sandy an offer funded by the federal government made in 2013 to buyout 250 houses in the floodplain near the river was accepted by many residents.[22]

Transportation[edit]

Sayreville is near several major roadways - the Garden State Parkway, New Jersey Turnpike (Interstate 95), Interstate 287 which becomes Route 440 — providing access to Staten Island and Long Island, New York points — U.S. 1, U.S. 9, Route 18, Route 34, Route 35 and Route 36.

Three highway bridges span the Raritan River from the Sayreville side. The Edison Bridge on U.S. 9 and the Driscoll Bridge on the Garden State Parkway connect Woodbridge on the north with Sayreville on the south. The Victory Bridge carries Route 35, connecting Sayreville with Perth Amboy.

New Jersey Transit offers service between the borough and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan via the 131 and 139. Service within New Jersey is offered to Newark on the 67, to Jersey City on the 64, and to other local destinations on the 815 and 817 routes.[89]

Community[edit]

Sayreville is home to the Starland Ballroom concert venue, as well as several night clubs such as PURE, Deko, Club 35, Ale House! among other bars, clubs, and pubs.[citation needed]

The community is home to the Faith Fellowship Ministries World Outreach Center, a non-Denominational "megachurch" with weekly attendance of 9,200.[90]

Sayreville has two community football and cheerleading teams, the Sayreville Leprechauns and Morgan-Parlin Panthers.

Sayreville has a newly constructed Skate Park, located in Kennedy Park, for skaters and bikers all around New Jersey. Along with NJ Skateshop, it has brought skateboarders such as Bam Margera to the site. The skate park has also been home to numerous action sport competitions.[91]

Noted residents[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Sayreville include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Haydon, Tom. "Old Bridge mayor knocked out by Republican challenger; other Middlesex County Democrats win", The Star-Ledger, November 9, 2011. Accessed July 4, 2012. "Sayreville Republican Kennedy O'Brien won his fourth term as mayor, defeating former councilman Stanley Drwal, but Democrats retain control of the council as Lisa Eicher and Mary Novak won seats."
  5. ^ Administration Contacts, Borough of Sayreville. Accessed February 15, 2011.
  6. ^ ontacts, Borough of Sayreville. Accessed July 4, 2012.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 87.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Sayreville, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Sayreville borough, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 1, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 8. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Sayreville borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 7, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Sayreville, NJ, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 27, 2011.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Sayreville, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  17. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 4, 2012.
  19. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 3, 2012.
  21. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 173. Accessed May 8, 2012.
  22. ^ a b Evan Lehmann (May 7, 2013). "RISK: N.J. town, flood-soaked and weary, tries to back away from the water". ClimateWire E&E. Retrieved May 8, 2013. 
  23. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 29, 2013.
  24. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  25. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed May 8, 2012. Data is for Sayreville Township.
  26. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed May 8, 2012.
  27. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed May 8, 2012.
  28. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Sayreville borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  29. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Sayreville borough, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  30. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Sayreville borough, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 8, 2012.
  31. ^ Mayor's Page, Borough of Sayreville. Accessed July 19, 2013.
  32. ^ Borough Council, Borough of Sayreville. Accessed July 19, 2013.
  33. ^ About Us, Sayreville Emergency Squad. Accessed May 8, 2012.
  34. ^ Sayreville Fire Department, Borough of Sayreville. Accessed May 8, 2012.
  35. ^ About Us, Sayreville Police Auxiliary. Accessed July 29, 2013.
  36. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 64, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  40. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  41. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  42. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  43. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  44. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 30, 2014.
  45. ^ District 19 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 30, 2014.
  46. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  47. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  48. ^ Ronald G. Rios, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  49. ^ Carol Barrett Bellante, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  50. ^ Kenneth Armwood, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  51. ^ Charles Kenny, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  52. ^ H. James Polos, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  53. ^ Charles E. Tomaro, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  54. ^ Blanquita B. Valenti, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  55. ^ a b Elected County Officials, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  56. ^ 11/5/2013 General Election Unofficial Results, Middlesex County, November 12, 2013. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  57. ^ Staff. "Middlesex County election results 2012", NJ.com, November 6, 2012, updated November 13, 2012. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  58. ^ Staff. "Middlesex County election results 2011", The Star-Ledger, November 8, 2011. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  59. ^ County Clerk, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  60. ^ Sheriff, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  61. ^ Surrogate, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  62. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Middlesex, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  63. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Middlesex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  64. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Middlesex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  65. ^ 2009 Governor: Middlesex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 27, 2012.
  66. ^ Data for the Sayreville Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  67. ^ Emma Arleth Elementary School, Sayreville Public Schools. Accessed July 29, 2013.
  68. ^ Dwight D. Eisenhower Elementary School, Sayreville Public Schools. Accessed July 29, 2013.
  69. ^ Harry S. Truman Elementary School, Sayreville Public Schools. Accessed July 29, 2013.
  70. ^ Woodrow Wilson Elementary School, Sayreville Public Schools. Accessed July 29, 2013.
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  73. ^ Sayreville War Memorial High School, Sayreville Public Schools. Accessed July 29, 2013.
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  84. ^ All about The Raritan River Railroad
  85. ^ Borough Set to Buy Tract for $32M, Cityfeet.com, January 4, 2005.
  86. ^ Sera to court
  87. ^ Get rid of play to play at NL.
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  90. ^ "Top 100 Largest Churches". Outreach Magazine. Retrieved 2010-08-03. 
  91. ^ Skate Park, Borough of Sayreville. Accessed October 27, 2011.
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  98. ^ Granieri, Laurie. "Sayreville native Dule Hill gears up for show's new season", Home News Tribune, August 7, 2009. Accessed February 15, 2011. "The biggest challenge for me is not making Gus too nerdy or too cool. Because Gus is a nerd, says Hill, 34, who grew up in Sayreville and is a 1993 graduate of Sayreville War Memorial High School. "
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  101. ^ Staff. "Red Sox Shift Minor Pilots", The New York Times, December 13, 1947. Accessed February 15, 2011. "The signing of Eddie Popowski of Sayreville, NJ, as 1948 manager was announced today by the Lynn Red Sox of the Class B New England League."
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  103. ^ SMU Team Profile.
  104. ^ Makin, Robert. "Kiss it Goodbye", [[Courier News (New Jersey)|]], June 8, 2000. Accessed February 15, 2011. "Lifelong members of the Kiss Army, such as guitarist Dave 'Snake' Sabo of Sayreville and music writer Jeff Kitts of Scotch Plains..."
  105. ^ John L. Moore, ed. (1994). Congressional Quarterly's Guide to U.S. Elections (3rd ed.). Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly. p. 1543. ISBN 0-87187-996-4.  pg. 1251
  106. ^ Sullivan, Joseph F. "Seven Vying to Succeed Patten In 15th Congressional District; 7 Vie to Succeed Patten in 15th C.D.", The New York Times, May 11, 1980. Accessed February 15, 2011. "Secondly, in the general election in November 1978, Charles Wiley of Sayreville, a freelance reporter and Republican conservative whom Mr. Patien had easily defeated in 1976, actually led the incumbent in the vote in the 15 Middlesex County towns that make up the district."
  107. ^ Assembly Member John S. Wisniewski, Project Vote Smart. Accessed August 12, 2007.

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