New York State Route 198

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This article is about the current alignment of NY 198. For the former alignment of NY 198 in Monroe County, see New York State Route 252A.

NYS Route 198 marker

NYS Route 198
Scajaquada Expressway
Map of Buffalo with NY 198 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by NYSDOT
Length: 3.59 mi[3] (5.78 km)
Existed: 1962[1][2] – present
Major junctions
West end: I-190 / Thruway in Buffalo
East end: NY 33 in Buffalo
Location
Counties: Erie
Highway system
NY 197 NY 199

New York State Route 198 (NY 198) is a state highway located entirely within the city of Buffalo, New York, in the United States. It is named the Scajaquada Expressway for Scajaquada Creek, which it parallels as it heads across northern Buffalo. NY 198 connects the Niagara Thruway (Interstate 190 or I-190) in the Black Rock neighborhood to the Kensington Expressway (NY 33) on Buffalo's east side. On average, the highway carries over 37,000 cars per day.[3]

Route description[edit]

NY 198 westbound approaching the exit for NY 265 and NY 266

NY 198 begins at exit 11, a semi-directional T-interchange, of I-190 in the Black Rock section in the city of Buffalo, alongside the Niagara River. NY 198 proceeds northeastward as the Scajaquada Expressway, a four-lane expressway through Buffalo. Just after the interchange, the route crosses over NY 266 (Niagara Street) and westbound serves an interchange with NY 266 and NY 265. NY 198 winds northeast into the West Side of Buffalo, crossing the campus of Buffalo State College as it enters an interchange with Grant Street, accessible from both directions. At this interchange, NY 198 bends eastward along the northern edge of campus, passing the football field, Moore Dining Hall, and several halls as it bends southeast alongside the campus.[4]

Now in the Elmwood section of Buffalo, NY 198 bends eastward once again, entering the interchange with Elmwood Avenue. After the interchange, NY 198 bends northeast, with a ramp from the college merging in. Running alongside Park Lake, NY 198 enters the North Buffalo section of the city. The four-lane expressway crosses through Delaware Park, crossing the tennis courts and into an interchange with NY 384 (Delaware Avenue). After NY 384, NY 198 bends southeast, passing north of Forest Lawn Cemetery and south of Delaware Park Golf Course. After entering an at-grade intersection with Parkside Avenue, NY 198 leaves Delaware Park and returns to a four-lane limited-access expressway.[4]

After the conversion, NY 198 interchanges with NY 5 (Main Street) just north of the Humboldt-Hospital station of Buffalo's Metro Rail. The expressway crosses under Kensington Avenue and continues southeast past the Main-Humboldt Townhouses. Entering the Masten section of Buffalo, NY 198 continues southeast into an interchange with NY 33 (the Kensington Expressway), where the Scajaquada Expressway merges into the Kensington. This merge marks the eastern terminus of the NY 198 designation.[4]

History[edit]

NY 198 eastbound at the interchange with NY 384 in Delaware Park

The modern NY 198 corridor was originally served by Scajaquada Drive and Humboldt Parkway, two surface streets that linked Delaware Park to Humboldt Park (now Martin Luther King, Jr. Park). Scajaquada Drive began at Grant Street and went eastward through Delaware Park to Agassiz Circle. Here, it met Humboldt Parkway, which ran from NY 384 in Delaware Park to Fillmore Avenue at Humboldt Park by way of the modern Scajaquada and Kensington Expressway corridors.[5] Construction of the Scajaquada Expressway began in the early 1960s.[1][6] The first section of the freeway extended from Grant Street to NY 384 and was completed by 1961.[1] An extension west to the Niagara Thruway opened in 1962, at which time all of the expressway was designated as NY 198.[1][2] The portion of Humboldt Parkway between NY 384 and the Kensington Expressway was upgraded into a divided highway in the mid-1960s,[7][8] at which time it became part of NY 198.[9]

Community activists have proposed that the highway be downgraded to a pedestrian-friendly roadway more in harmony with the surrounding communities.[10] The New York State Department of Transportation is investigating the feasibility of the project, currently estimated to cost around $85 million. According to the state, no work will be performed until 2016 at the earliest.[11]

Exit list[edit]

The entire route is in Buffalo, Erie County. All exits are unnumbered.

Mile[3] km Destinations Notes
0.00 0.00 I-190 / Thruway Westbound exit and eastbound entrance
NY 265 / NY 266 Westbound exit and eastbound entrance; southern terminus of NY 265
0.75 1.21 Grant Street – Buffalo State College
1.42 2.29 Elmwood Avenue
2.02 3.25 NY 384 (Delaware Avenue)
Parkside Avenue – Buffalo Zoo At-grade intersection
2.93 4.72 NY 5 (Main Street) Access to/from NY 5 via Humboldt Parkway
3.59 5.78 NY 33 (Kensington Expressway) Eastbound exit and westbound entrance
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Sunoco (1961). New York and Metropolitan New York (Map). Cartography by H.M. Gousha Company (1961–62 ed.).
  2. ^ a b Esso (1962). New York with Sight-Seeing Guide (Map). Cartography by General Drafting (1962 ed.).
  3. ^ a b c "2008 Traffic Volume Report for New York State" (PDF). New York State Department of Transportation. June 16, 2009. p. 183. Retrieved January 30, 2010. 
  4. ^ a b c Microsoft. "overview map of NY 198". Bing Maps (Map). Cartography by Nokia. http://binged.it/MNGCB7. Retrieved May 25, 2012.
  5. ^ Esso (1958). New York with Special Maps of Putnam–Rockland–Westchester Counties and Finger Lakes Region (Map). Cartography by General Drafting (1958 ed.).
  6. ^ Gulf Oil Company (1960). New York and New Jersey Tourgide Map (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally and Company.
  7. ^ Mobil (1965). New York (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally and Company.
  8. ^ Esso (1968). New York (Map). Cartography by General Drafting (1969–70 ed.).
  9. ^ State of New York Department of Transportation (January 1, 1970). Official Description of Touring Routes in New York State (PDF). Retrieved June 25, 2010. 
  10. ^ "Scajaquada Corridor Study". City of Buffalo. Retrieved June 25, 2010. 
  11. ^ "N.Y. Route 198 – Scajaquada Corridor". New York State Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 25, 2010. 

External links[edit]