Schizobasis

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Schizobasis
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Monocots
Order: Asparagales
Family: Asparagaceae
Subfamily: Scilloideae
Genus: Schizobasis
Baker[1]

Schizobasis is a genus of bulbous flowering plants in the family Asparagaceae, subfamily Scilloideae (also treated as the family Hyacinthaceae).[2] It is distributed from Ethiopia to South Africa.[1] It is sometimes included in the genus Drimia. One species, S. intricata, is sometimes cultivated, as a bulbous or succulent plant.

Description[edit]

Schizobasis plants grow from bulbs. One or two leaves form on young bulbs, but soon die. The flowers are borne on many branched green stems, which form an inflorescence persisting throughout the flowering season. Individual flowers open at night and have six white, pale yellow or pale pink tepals, which are joined at the base and then spread out. The seeds are black.[3]

S. intricata may be grown as a succulent plant, with its bulbs partially exposed.[4]

Systematics[edit]

The genus Schizobasis was created by John Gilbert Baker in 1873, initially for the species S. macowanii, now regarded as synonymous with S. intricata.[5] Although accepted by some sources (such as the World Checklist of Selected Plant Families as of April 2013[5]), other sources merge Schizobasis into the genus Drimia. Either as a separate genus or as part of Drimia, it is placed in the tribe Urgineeae (or subfamily Urgineoideae by those who accept the family Hyacinthaceae).[6]

Species[edit]

As of April 2013, the World Checklist of Selected Plant Families recognized the following four species:[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Schizobasis", World Checklist of Selected Plant Families, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, retrieved 2013-04-13 
  2. ^ Stevens, P.F. (2001 onwards), Angiosperm Phylogeny Website: Asparagales: Scilloideae, retrieved 2013-04-13 
  3. ^ Hyde, M.A.; Wursten, B.T.; Ballings; P. (2002–2013), "Genus page: Schizobasis", Flora of Zimbabwe, retrieved 2013-04-13 
  4. ^ "Schizobasis intricata (Baker) Baker", Plant Introductions of the Huntington Botanical Gardens, 2004, retrieved 2013-04-13 
  5. ^ a b c Search for "Schizobasis", World Checklist of Selected Plant Families, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, retrieved 2013-04-13 
  6. ^ Manning, J.C.; Goldblatt, P.; Fay, M.F. (2004), "A revised generic synopsis of Hyacintheaceae in sub-Saharan Africa, based on molecular evidence, including new combinations and the new tribe Pseudoprospereae", Edinburgh Journal of Botany 60 (3): 533–568, doi:10.1017/S0960428603000404 

External links[edit]

  • Dimopoulos, Panos & Dimopoulos, Stavros (2005), Schizobasis intricata, International Bulb Society, retrieved 2013-04-13  – photographs of Schizobasis intricata