Prime Minister's Prizes for Science

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The Prime Minister's Prizes for Science are an annual Australian award for outstanding achievements in science and science teaching. The prizes have been awarded since 2000, when they replaced the Australia Prize for science. The major award is the Prime Minister's Prize for Science, it is regarded as the national award for scientific achievement,[1] the Frank Fenner Prize for Life Scientist of the Year (previously known as the Science Minister's Prize for Science[2]) and the Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist of the Year were also created in 2000. Prizes for teaching at primary and secondary schools were added in 2002.

Awards[edit]

Prime Minister's Prize for Science[edit]

The recipient of this prize can be an individual or up to four people that have worked as a team in any scientific field. The recipient receives $300,000, a medal and lapel pin and serves on the Prime Minister's Science, Engineering and Innovation Council for a year.

Frank Fenner Prize for Life Scientist of the Year[edit]

This award is for early to mid-career scientists, not more than ten years past the award of their highest degree (e.g. Master’s or PhD), working in the life sciences. The recipient receives $50,000, a medal and a lapel pin.[3]

Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist of the Year[edit]

This award is for early to mid-career scientists, not more than ten years past the award of their highest degree (e.g. Master’s or PhD), working in the physical sciences. The recipient receives $50,000, a medal and a lapel pin.[4]

Prime Minister's Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Primary Schools[edit]

This prize is awarded to an individual who has made a significant contribution to teaching science at a primary school level. The recipient is awards $50,000,a medal and lapel pin.

  • 2013 - Richard Johnson
  • 2012 - Michael van der Ploeg
  • 2011 - Brooke Topelberg
  • 2010 - Matthew McCloskey
  • 2009 – Allan Whittome
  • 2008 - Bronwyn Mart
  • 2007 - Cheryl Capra
  • 2006 - Marjorie Colvill
  • 2005 - Mark Merritt
  • 2004 - Alwyn Powell
  • 2003 - Sarah Tennant
  • 2002 - Marianne Nicholas

Prime Minister's Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools[edit]

This prize is awarded to an individual who has made a significant contribution to teaching science at a secondary school level. The recipient is awards $50,000, a medal and lapel pin.

  • 2013 - Sarah Chapman
  • 2012 - Anita Trenwith
  • 2011 - Jane Wright
  • 2010 - Debra Smith
  • 2009 - Len Altman
  • 2008 - Clay Reid
  • 2007 - Francesca Calati
  • 2006 - Anna Davis
  • 2005 - Mike Roach
  • 2004 - Mark Butler
  • 2003 - Pam Garnett
  • 2002 - Ruth Dircks

History of the Prime Minister's Prizes for Science[edit]

The Australia Prize was the predecessor award to the Prime Minister's Prizes for Science and was awarded annually from 1990 to 1999 (although no award was made in 1991). It was an international award, aimed at a worldwide audience for an outstanding specific achievement in a selected area of science and technology promoting human welfare. It achieved widespread recognition by individuals and organisations throughout the world, receiving nominations from 18 countries.

The Government awarded the Australia Prize to both Australian and international scientists. Of the 28 recipients, 18 were Australian, demonstrating Australia's strong international standing in many scientific fields.

The Australia Prize was replaced in 2000 by the current set of prizes.[5]

Australia Prize recipients[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]