Scooter (Muppet)

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Scooter
The Muppets character
ScooterMuppet.jpg
First appearance The Muppet Show
Created by Jim Henson
Performed by
Information
Species Muppet
Gender Male
Occupation Gofer / Stage Manager

Scooter is a fictional character from The Muppets. In The Muppet Show he was the troupe's backstage "gofer". He was originally performed by Richard Hunt until Richard's death in 1992, and is currently performed by David Rudman.

Characteristics[edit]

He is orange with a darker orange sprout of hair. In keeping with the jokes about bespectacled Muppets such as Dr. Bunsen Honeydew, Scooter's eyes are actually the lenses of his glasses. Behind the glasses frames, there's nothing but his orange skin (although unlike Bunsen, whose glasses were transparent, Scooter had actual "eyes" with pupils that were attached to the glasses' lenses). Hunt based Scooter's personality on his own self from when he was younger and his voice is a western accent.

A few things have been revealed about Scooter's family. As cited in Of Muppets and Men, when pressed about his family, he explained that his mother was a parrot but he didn't know about his father. However, this is not necessarily canonical. Scooter's uncle J.P. Grosse is clearly a humanoid Muppet, suggesting that Scooter is meant to be one as well.

Scooter's appearance is similar to a gopher, which may be a pun on his job as a "gofer".

In the Muppet Babies animated series, he was redesigned as a brainy, computer-knowledgeable child and given a tomboyish twin sister named Skeeter (who does not appear in any other Muppets-related projects, other than the Muppet Kids books, which were really a tie-in to the cartoon).

Roles[edit]

Originally, Scooter got his job as a "gofer" because his rich uncle J. P. Grosse owned the theatre, and he maintained it through a combination of efficiency and nepotism. Originally, Scooter would often use his family connection to his advantage, making unreasonable demands on his uncle's behalf.

His antagonistic role was gradually discarded, and he became a legitimate assistant to Kermit, with the two becoming friends. Eventually, his job was often closer to that of a stage manager, or even that of a subordinate producer, and he would do whatever he could to help Kermit to (albeit unsuccessfully) keep order among the Muppets.

In the second through fourth seasons, Scooter featured in the cold openings, where he would enter the guest star's dressing room to tell them "fifteen seconds to curtain." In the dressing room, a gag or short comical sketch would occur before the opening theme song. For the fifth season, a new style of cold opening featuring Pops replaced this format.

Scooter sometimes helped Miss Piggy to get Kermit to be romantically interested in her. He was also on good terms with Fozzie Bear, being less annoyed with his jokes than most people, and they performed a duet or double act onstage in a few episodes.

His relationship with Floyd Pepper, who frequently appeared backstage, may be comparable to Hunt's relationship with Jerry Nelson. The two puppeteers frequently collaborated, with the elder Nelson helping the younger Hunt to develop his performing abilities from the start. Hunt and Nelson were also known for being vocally talented, and Scooter sat in with the band on occasion (as a vocalist or guest musician). Scooter and Floyd's rendition of "Mr. Bass Man" symbolizes Hunt and Nelson's relationship.

Scooter has appeared in most Muppet films and television specials. In The Muppet Movie, Scooter acts as The Electric Mayhem's manager. In The Great Muppet Caper, he was a resident of the Happiness Hotel. In The Muppets Take Manhattan, he was among the core group who attended college together and struggled to put their show on. In this appearance, he was the treasurer of the group, and later took a leadership role in Kermit's brief, amnesia-fueled absence, making decisions for the group to follow. Also, Scooter makes an appearance in the pre-show queue at the Disney attraction, Muppet*Vision 3D, located at Disney's Hollywood Studios and Disney California Adventure Park.

Following the original performer's death in 1992, Scooter was not really seen until 1999 when he had a cameo in Muppets from Space, with one line of dialogue. He had somewhat larger roles in subsequent productions, beginning with It's a Very Merry Muppet Christmas Movie (2002). In The Muppets' Wizard of Oz (2005), he played the Wizard's assistant. He also took on supporting roles in the second Studio DC: Almost Live special (2008) and in A Muppet Christmas: Letters to Santa (2008).

Scooter later appears in The Muppets (2011) where he is working at Google and on his way to the TED conference, iPad in hand (oddly enough not a Google Android tablet), when he is first seen. Just as in The Muppets Take Manhattan, Scooter here appears as a leading figure of the Muppets - he spearheads the clean-up and repairs of the Muppet Studio, and even takes over hosting duties for Kermit at one point (though much to his stage fright).

Casting history[edit]

Scooter was first performed by Richard Hunt (1976 - 1992) until his death. Unlike most major Muppets, Scooter has been performed by a total of 7 different people. After a 7-year retirement, the character went through a series of short-lived performers (1999 - 2005) before finally finding a new performer in David Rudman (2008 - present).

Main Performers:

Alternate Performers:

References[edit]

External links[edit]