Scotland on Sunday

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Scotland on Sunday
Scotland on Sunday logo.png
Type Sunday newspaper
Format Broadsheet
Owner(s) Johnston Press
Editor Ian Stewart
Founded 1988
Headquarters 108 Holyrood Rd, Edinburgh
Circulation 39,250 [1]
Official website scotlandonsunday.scotsman.com

Scotland on Sunday is a Scottish Sunday newspaper, published in Edinburgh by The Scotsman Publications Ltd and consequently assuming the role of Sunday sister to its daily stablemate The Scotsman. It was printed in broadsheet format but in 2013 was relauched as a tabloid. Since this latest relauch it comprises three parts, the newspaper itself which includes the original "Insight" section, a sports section and Spectrum magazine which incorporates "At Home", originally a separate magazine.

It backs a 'No' vote in the referendum on Scottish independence.[2]

History[edit]

Scotland on Sunday was launched on 7 August 1988 and was priced at 40p.

Ultimate ownership of Scotland on Sunday has changed several times since launch. The Scotsman Publications Limited, which also produces The Scotsman, Edinburgh Evening News and the Herald & Post series of free newspapers in Edinburgh, Fife, West Lothian and Perth, was bought by the Canadian millionaire Roy Thomson in 1953.

In 1995, the group was sold to the billionaire Barclay Brothers for £85 million. They moved the group from its landmark Edinburgh office on North Bridge, which is now an upmarket hotel, to new offices in Holyrood Road, near where the Scottish Parliament Building was subsequently built. Then in December 2005 the paper, along with the other Scotsman Publications titles, was sold to Edinburgh based newspaper group Johnston Press in a £160 million deal.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ McIvor, Jamie (2012-12-07). "BBC News - Scottish newspaper see sales slump". Bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2013-09-15. 
  2. ^ "Scotland can be changed for the better with a no vote". Scotland on Sunday. 14 September 2014. Retrieved 14 September 2014.