Scott Baker (writer)

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Scott Baker (born 1947 in Chicago) is an American science fiction, fantasy, and horror writer. He may be the only person to hold a Masters of Arts degree in Speculative Fiction (Goddard College). After 20 years in Paris, he now lives in Pacific Grove, California. His first novel, Symbiote's Crown (l'Idiot-roi) received the French "PRIX Apollo" award. This novel was science fiction. He won a World Fantasy Award for Best Short Fiction in 1985 for Still Life with Scorpion, and has been nominated for the award three other times.[1] Baker was co-author of the screenplay for the French film LITAN, which won the "Prix de la Critique" (Critic's Prize) at the Avoriaz Fantastic Film Festival in 1982, and has worked on a number of other French films. He wrote some of the websites for WHO KILLED EVAN CHANG, the web tie-in for Steven Spielberg’s film, AI (Warner Brothers, 2001). He has been a judge for the World Fantasy Award and the Philip K. Dick Award.

Bibliography[edit]

Novels[edit]

  • Symbiote's Crown (1978)
  • Nightchild (1979)
  • Dhampire (1982)
  • Drink the Fire from the Flames (1987) (Ashlu)
  • Firedance (1986) (Ashlu)
  • Webs (1989)
  • Ancestral Hungers (1996)

Short Story Collections (in French only)[edit]

  • Nouvelle recette pour canard au sang (1983)
  • Fringales (1985)
  • Aléas (1985)

Short Stories[edit]

  • Flatsquid Thrills (1982)
  • The Path (1982)
  • The Lurking Duck (1983) [World Fantasy nominee]
  • Still Life with Scorpion (1984) [World Fantasy winner]
  • Sea Change (1986)
  • Nesting Instinct (1987) [World Fantasy nominee]
  • The Sins of the Fathers (1988)
  • Varicose Worms (1989) [World Fantasy nominee]
  • Alimentary Tract (1990)
  • The Jamesburg Incubus (1990)
  • Virus Dreams (1993)
  • Prospero (1993)
  • Full Fathom Deep (1995)

Anthologies (in French only)[edit]

  • Ombres portées (1990)

References[edit]

  1. ^ World Fantasy Convention. "Award Winners and Nominees". Retrieved 4 February 2011. 

External links[edit]