Scott Cairns

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Scott Cairns, PhD (né Scott Clifford Cairns; born 1954 Tacoma, Washington) is an American poet, memoirist, librettist, and essayist.

Formal education[edit]

Cairns earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Western Washington University (1977), a Master of Arts degree from Hollins University (1979), a Master of Fine Arts degree from Bowling Green State University (1981), and a PhD from the University of Utah (1990).[1]

Academic career[edit]

Cairns has served on the faculties of Kansas State University, Westminster College, University of North Texas, Old Dominion University.[2] He currently is the Catherine Paine Middlebush Chair in English at the University of Missouri.[3] While at North Texas, Cairns had served as editor of the American Literary Review. He now also directs Writing Workshops in Greece, an annual, 4-week workshop during the month of June, located on the island of Thasos.

Works[edit]

Cairns is the author of seven collections of poetry, one collection of translations of Christian mystics, one spiritual memoir, a book-length essay on suffering, and co-edited The Sacred Place with Scott Olsen, an anthology of poetry, fiction and nonfiction. It won the inaugural National Outdoor Book Award (Outdoor Literature category) in 1997. He wrote the libretto for "The Martyrdom of Saint Polycarp," an oratorio composed by JAC Redford, and the libretto for "A Melancholy Beauty," an oratorio composed by Georgi Andreev. Cairns's poems have appeared in journals including The Atlantic Monthly, The Paris Review, The New Republic, Image, and Poetry, and have been anthologized in Upholding Mystery (Oxford University Press, 1996), Best Spiritual Writing (Harper Collins, 1998 and 2000), and Best American Spiritual Writing (Houghton Mifflin, 2004, 2005, and 2006).

Family[edit]

He is married to Marcia Lane Vanderlip and they have two children, Benjamin V. Cairns and Elizabeth V. Cairns-Callen. He has a brother, Steve Cairns, who currently resides in Hong Kong, teaching at an International School.

Awards[edit]

Works[edit]

External links[edit]

Part I, June 10, 2009
Part II, June 11, 2009

References[edit]

Bibliography

General references (biographical)

  1. A Directory of American Poets and Fiction Writers, editions 1985 through 2002, New York: Poets & Writers
  2. Biography Index, A cumulative index to biographical material in books and magazines; Volume 28: September 2002 — August 2003, New York: H.W. Wilson Co., 2003
  3. Contemporary Authors, A bio-bibliographical guide to current writers in fiction, general nonfiction, poetry, journalism, drama, motion pictures, television, and other fields; Volume 146, Detroit: Gale Research, 1995
  4. Contemporary Authors, New Revision Series. A bio-bibliographical guide to current writers in fiction, general nonfiction, poetry, journalism, drama, motion pictures, television, and other fields; Volume 91, Detroit: Gale Group, 2000
  5. The Writers Directory, editions 13 through 23 (1998–2007), Detroit: St. James Press, 1999
  6. Who's Who in the South and Southwest; 23rd edition, 1993–1994, New Providence, NJ: Marquis Who's Who, 1993

Inline citations