Scottevest

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Scottevest, Inc.
Type Private
Industry Apparel, Licensing
Founders Scott Jordan
Headquarters Ketchum, Idaho, U.S.
Area served Worldwide
Products Apparel
Website Scottevest.com

Scottevest is a company based in Ketchum, Idaho which specialises in clothing with conduit systems and specialized pockets and compartments for holding mobile phones, tablet computers and other portable electronic devices, and managing and controlling their wires.[1]

Origins and history[edit]

Scottevest was founded in 2000 by Scott Jordan in Chicago, Illinois. The company takes its name from its founder's first name together with its first product, known as the eVest, described as "a techie version of the classic fisherman's vest".[2][3] In 2003, Scottevest moved its headquarters from Chicago to Ketchum, Idaho.[4]

Products[edit]

Scottevest manufactures vests, jackets, hats and other garments which incorporate specialized pockets and wire management features.[5][6] Jordan describes his company's output as travel clothing "that doesn't look like travel clothing."[1]

Their coats and jackets are designed to enable wearers to carry mobile phones, tablets, and portable electronics, alongside other items such as water bottles, books and travel documents, keeping their hands free.[7] The garments are deliberately designed to circumnavigate baggage allowance weight and space restrictions by enabling wearers to stash the usual contents of their carry-on bag in up to 42 specially designed pockets.[7][8] The coats, which are available for both men and women, are specially designed to distribute the weight of the loaded pockets evenly across the garment while maintaining a slim, non-bulky silhouette.[8] In addition to the jackets and outerwear, more unusual products include boxer shorts with a pocket for a smartphone.[1] In addition, Scottevest garments from the beginning were designed to include channels for threading wires and cables, inspired by an accident Jordan had after snagging his headphone cable on a doorhandle while running through an airport.[1]

For charging gadgets, some Scottevest jackets incorporated flexible, detachable solar panels (made using CIGS on a stainless steel substrate) into the design.[9] The solar panels were also offered in vest form.[10] Scottevest were the first to offer a wearable battery for recharging Google Glass, incorporated into a shirt.[1][11]

Scottevest and TEC In The Media[edit]

On March 1, 2012, Scott Jordan appeared on Episode 307 of the ABC Show, Shark Tank.[12] After a bit of verbal sparring between Jordan and the Sharks, particularly Mark Cuban (who raised fears that wireless technology could eventually make the patented eVest technology obsolete), Jordan rejected the Sharks' offers for up to $1M in funding over a reluctance to include the retail side of the business in any deal, which all of the Sharks insisted was a more lucrative and lower-risk investment. Despite not getting funding, the appearance heightened awareness of the product and is viewed by Jordan as a successful pitch.

Litigation[edit]

In 2002 Scottevest was threatened with a lawsuit by IBM over the use of a cursive lower case "e" in Scottevest's logo (originally spelled "Scott eVest").,[13] but the issue was dropped after a small change in the font.

In 2004, Scott USA of Sun Valley, Idaho sued Scottevest for trademark violations, alleging that Scottevest violated company trademark by using the word "Scott" in its brand name.[4] Jordan insisted any similaries were purely coincidental and Scottevest never tried to gain advantage through the Scott USA brand. The case was settled, with Scottevest agreeing to concatenate and capitalize its brand name to Scottevest instead of Scott eVest.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Conner, Cheryl (7 January 2014). "How Wearable Tech's SCOTTEVEST Is Setting The Bar For PR". Forbes.com. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
  2. ^ "Fresh Gear: Scott eVEST", Businessweek.com, November 12, 2001
  3. ^ Fabrizio Pilato, "Scott eVEST Version 2.0" Mobile Magazine, January 24, 2002
  4. ^ a b Foley, Gregory (23 June 2004). "A war of the ‘Scotts’ looms: Scott USA sues ScotteVest for trademark violations". Idaho Mountain Express. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
  5. ^ ScotteVest Gadget Garb Premiers
  6. ^ Scott Jordan Signature System: How Geek Can Meet Chic
  7. ^ a b Upe, Robert (30 April 2014). "How to beat carry-on baggage restrictions: meet the Scottevest coat". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
  8. ^ a b Kim, Soo (2 May 2014). "The trench coat that beats baggage charges". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
  9. ^ Cho, Gilsoo; Seungsin Lee; Jayoung Cho. (2010). "Review and Reappraisal of Smart Clothing". In Gilsoo Cho. Smart clothing : technology and applications ([Online-Ausg.]. ed.). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press. p. 11. ISBN 9781420088533. 
  10. ^ Hurford, R. D. (2009). "Types of smart clothes and wearable technology". In J. McCann; D. Bryson. Smart clothes and wearable technology. Cambridge: Woodhead Publishing Ltd. pp. 25–44. ISBN 9781845695668. 
  11. ^ Lanier, Xavier. "The Shirt that Powers Google Glass". GottaBeMobile.com. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
  12. ^ "Episode 307 - Shark Tank"
  13. ^ Chicago Business article about IBM vs. Scottevest, Inc.(subscription required)
  14. ^ "Suit settled"

External links[edit]