Scrap Happy Daffy

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Scrap Happy Daffy
Looney Tunes (Daffy Duck) series
ScrapHappyDaffy.jpg
Title card
Directed by Frank Tashlin
Produced by Leon Schlesinger
Story by Don Christensen
Voices by Mel Blanc
Music by Carl W. Stalling
Animation by Credited:
Art Davis
Uncredited:
Cal Dalton
Phil Monroe
I. Ellis
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
The Vitaphone Corporation
Release date(s) August 21, 1943 (USA)
Color process Black-and-white
Running time 8 min (one reel)
Language English

Scrap Happy Daffy is a Warner Bros. World War II short featuring Daffy Duck, directed by Frank Tashlin and released in 1943. Daffy is the guard of a scrap yard, doing his part to help America win the war against the Nazis, but the Nazis decide to destroy his scrap pile by sending a billy goat out to eat everything in sight.

The short was also the final appearance of Daffy Duck in black and white.

Plot[edit]

Daffy is a guard at a scrap pile, encouraging Americans to "Get the tin out", "Get the iron out" and especially "Get the lead out". Singing We're in to Win, Daffy goes over the various things Americans can send to help with the war effort. However, this doesn't go down well with Adolf Hitler, who reads about Daffy's scrap pile helping to beat Benito Mussolini, and responds to this by giving his men the following order: "Destroy that scrap pile!"

With the word out, a Nazi submarine sends a torpedo to the scrap pile — which has a billy goat inside, who immediately starts eating everything in sight. Daffy, hearing the noise, tries to find out what's making the noise. After temporarily pointing a rifle at a reflection of himself (thinking that he cornered someone else), Daffy finds the goat hiccuping with the garbage inside him and amiably offers him a bicarbonate. However, when Daffy sees the swastika that the goat (whom he derides as a "tin termite") is wearing, he starts messing with the goat. Temporarily getting the better of the goat, Daffy is almost undone when he tries to whack the goat with a mallet - but the mallet gets stuck in the goat's horns and the goat knocks Daffy around.

Daffy is ready to call it quits (saying "What I'd give for a can of spinach now", a direct reference to Popeye whose theatrical cartoons are now owned by WB), but is encouraged by the ghosts of his 'ancestors' — ducks who landed on Plymouth Rock, who encamped at Valley Forge with George Washington, who explored with Daniel Boone, who sailed with John Paul Jones, and who stood in for Abraham Lincoln. Daffy's spirits back up when he realizes, "Americans don't give up, and I'm an American... duck!", and then he turns into "Super American" in a reference to Superman (whose owner, DC Comics, is now a WB subsidiary itself). Daffy flies after the goat, knocking him around. The goat makes a run for the submarine, but Daffy repels all bullets shot at him and starts yanking on the periscope. Just then, the scene changes to Daffy yanking on a fire hose and getting hosed down. Daffy wakes up, thinking it was all just a dream — until he looks up at the Nazi submarine sitting on top of the scrap pile, where the Nazis tell Daffy, "Next time you dream, include us out!"

Availability[edit]

This cartoon was colorized in 1995, with a computer adding color to a new print of the original black and white cartoon. This preserved the quality of the original animation. However, this new colorized version was never broadcast on American television (due to its subject matter). A clip of this cartoon (which, oddly, was featured colorized and restored) was shown on a documentary about World War II-era cartoons and on a documentary on Frank Tashlin on the third volume of the Looney Tunes Golden Collection, and is featured independently on the Looney Tunes Golden Collection: Volume 5 (shown in its original black and white format). The original black and white cartoon is also available as a special feature for the DVD release of the Warner Bros. 1943 movie Air Force. This cartoon has now fallen into the public domain because the copyright was not renewed after 1971.

External links[edit]