Scupper

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"Scuppers" redirects here. For the children's book, see Scuppers The Sailor Dog.
Two scuppers cut into either side of this outdoor stairwell prevent water from building up and making the stairs slippery.

A scupper is an opening in the side walls of an open-air structure, for purposes of draining water. They are usually placed at or near ground level, and allow rain or liquids to flow off the side of the open-air structure, instead of pooling within the walls.[1]

Ship's bulwark and scupper in Russian and English.

There are two main kinds of scupper:

  1. Ships have scuppers at deck level, to allow for ocean or rainwater drain off.
  2. Buildings with railed rooftops can construct scuppers to let rainwater drain off, instead of pooling within the railing of the roof. Scuppers can also be placed in a parapet, for the same purpose.

The transitive verb "to scupper" (British) means to overwhelm or destroy.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Thomas Campbell; Samuel Carter Hall; Edward Bulwer Lytton Baron Lytton; Theodore Edward Hook, Thomas Hood, William Harrison Ainsworth (1831). New Monthly Magazine. Henry Colburn. pp. 418–. Retrieved 12 May 2013. 

Schematics employed in hydraulic diagrams.