Sea Bright, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Sea Bright, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Sea Bright
Map of Sea Bright in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Sea Bright in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Sea Bright, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Sea Bright, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°21′32″N 73°58′28″W / 40.358927°N 73.974343°W / 40.358927; -73.974343Coordinates: 40°21′32″N 73°58′28″W / 40.358927°N 73.974343°W / 40.358927; -73.974343[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated March 21, 1889
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Dina Long (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator / Clerk Richard M. Kachmar[4]
Area[1]
 • Total 1.287 sq mi (3.333 km2)
 • Land 0.730 sq mi (1.890 km2)
 • Water 0.557 sq mi (1.443 km2)  43.30%
Area rank 475th of 566 in state
42nd of 53 in county[1]
Elevation[6] 0 ft (0 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 1,412
 • Estimate (2013)[10] 1,359
 • Rank 517th of 566 in state
46th of 53 in county[11]
 • Density 1,935.5/sq mi (747.3/km2)
 • Density rank 296th of 566 in state
34th of 53 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07760[12][13]
Area code(s) 732[14]
FIPS code 3402566240[1][15][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885387[1][17]
Website www.sea-bright.com

Sea Bright is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,412,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 406 (-22.3%) from the 1,818 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 125 (+7.4%) from the 1,693 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Sea Bright was formed as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 21, 1889, from portions of Ocean Township, based on the results of a referendum held the previous day. The borough was reincorporated on March 10, 1897.[19]

History[edit]

Settlement in the area of Sea Bright began in the early 1840s, with a fishing community of simple shacks near the beach dunes that was called "Nauvoo". While many local historians had interpreted the name as a Native American word, the origin of "Nauvoo" is Sephardic Hebrew, from the same word that Mormon leader Joseph Smith gave to the Illinois town he founded in 1839. Meaning literally "beautiful or pleasant place," New Jersey's Nauvoo might well have been named by Smith, as he visited Monmouth County in 1840.[20]

One of the earliest accounts of the barrier beach, published a dozen years before Sea Bright's existence, describes a steamboat journey from New York to the Ocean House, a low rambling wooden structure situated on the beach opposite the mouth of the Navesink River. Built in 1842, this first hotel on the sandy strip offered "excellent fishing, fine sea bathing and capital accommodations" for three hundred patrons. Around this time the Sea Bright Skiff was developed in the Northern Jersey Shore. At the Ocean House one "found a number of beach carriages", as they are called, awaiting the arrival of the boat from New York City to take passengers to Long Branch.

Geography[edit]

Sea Bright is located at 40°21′32″N 73°58′28″W / 40.358927°N 73.974343°W / 40.358927; -73.974343 (40.358927,-73.974343). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.287 square miles (3.333 km2), of which, 0.730 square miles (1.890 km2) of it was land and 0.557 square miles (1.443 km2) of it (43.30%) of it was water.[1][2]

Sea Bright has seven members-only beach clubs of which five are in the North Beach area: Ship Ahoy, Sands, Surfrider, Sea Bright Beach Club and Chapel Beach Club; and two are south of the center of town: Driftwood and Edgewater, all of which charge thousands of dollars for membership and have waiting lists of several years for prospective members.[21] In addition, there is a large public, municipal beach in the center of town which charges a fee, but includes free parking and is protected by lifeguards, with entry limited to those who have purchased a beach badge.[22] The traditional surfing beach area, called the Anchorage, is free and public, but unguarded. In addition, there are numerous public access stairs to other unguarded beaches for fishing, recreation and suntanning.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 1,198
1910 1,220 1.8%
1920 856 −29.8%
1930 899 5.0%
1940 779 −13.3%
1950 999 28.2%
1960 1,138 13.9%
1970 1,339 17.7%
1980 1,812 35.3%
1990 1,693 −6.6%
2000 1,818 7.4%
2010 1,412 −22.3%
Est. 2013 1,359 [10][23] −3.8%
Population sources: 1900-1920[24]
1900-1910[25] 1910-1930[26]
1930-1990[27] 2000[28][29] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 1,412 people, 792 households, and 324.7 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,935.5 per square mile (747.3/km2). There were 1,211 housing units at an average density of 1,659.9 per square mile (640.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 94.55% (1,335) White, 0.78% (11) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 2.27% (32) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 1.49% (21) from other races, and 0.92% (13) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.52% (78) of the population.[7]

There were 792 households, of which 12.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.1% were married couples living together, 5.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 59.0% were non-families. 48.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.78 and the average family size was 2.54.[7]

In the borough, 11.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.2% from 18 to 24, 30.1% from 25 to 44, 38.8% from 45 to 64, and 14.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46.7 years. For every 100 females there were 106.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 107.3 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $74,236 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,921) and the median family income was $102,679 (+/- $37,943). Males had a median income of $84,412 (+/- $45,724) versus $72,898 (+/- $10,443) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $82,535 (+/- $20,263). About 3.5% of families and 4.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.3% of those under age 18 and 2.7% of those age 65 or over.[30]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 1,818 people, 1,003 households, and 402 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,846.9 people per square mile (1,096.8/km2). There were 1,202 housing units at an average density of 1,882.3 per square mile (725.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 94.39% White, 1.76% African American, 2.26% Asian, 0.88% from other races, and 0.72% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.51% of the population.[28][29]

There were 1,003 households out of which 11.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 29.6% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 59.9% were non-families. 45.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.81 and the average family size was 2.51.[28][29]

In the borough the population was spread out with 11.2% under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 41.5% from 25 to 44, 31.2% from 45 to 64, and 10.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 109.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 109.5 males.[28][29]

The median income for a household in the borough was $65,563, and the median income for a family was $72,031. Males had a median income of $60,417 versus $41,100 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $45,066. About 5.3% of families and 7.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.0% of those under age 18 and 3.7% of those age 65 or over.[28][29]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Sea Bright is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5] The Borough form of government used by Sea Bright, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[31][32]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Sea Bright is Independent Dina Long, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. Members of the Sea Bright Borough Council are Council President Brian P. Kelly (R, 2013), William "Jack" Keeler (R, 2015), Marc A. Leckstein (D, 2015), Peggy Bills (R, 2013), James LoBiondo, III (R, 2014) and C. Read Murphy (R, 2014).[33][34][35][36]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Sea Bright is located in the 6th Congressional District[37] and is part of New Jersey's 13th state legislative district.[8][38][39] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Sea Bright had been in the 11th state legislative district.[40]

New Jersey's Sixth Congressional District is represented by Frank Pallone (D, Long Branch).[41] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[42][43] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[44][45]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 13th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Joseph M. Kyrillos (R, Middletown Township) and in the General Assembly by Amy Handlin (R, Middletown Township) and Declan O'Scanlon (R, Little Silver).[46] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[47] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[48]

Monmouth County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members who are elected at-large to serve three year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[49] As of 2014, Monmouth County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Lillian G. Burry (R, Colts Neck Township; term ends December 31, 2014),[50] Freeholder Deputy Director Gary J. Rich, Sr. (R, Spring Lake; 2014),[51] Thomas A. Arnone (R, Neptune City; 2016),[52] John P. Curley (R, Middletown Township; 2015)[53] and Serena DiMaso (R, Holmdel Township; 2016).[54][55] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk M. Claire French (Wall Township),[56] Sheriff Shaun Golden (Farmingdale)[57] and Surrogate Rosemarie D. Peters (Middletown Township).[58]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,095 registered voters in Sea Bright, of which 248 (22.6%) were registered as Democrats, 305 (27.9%) were registered as Republicans and 541 (49.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another parties.[59]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 53.6% of the vote here (483 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 43.2% (389 votes) and other candidates with 1.7% (15 votes), among the 901 ballots cast by the borough's 1,220 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.9%.[60] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 55.9% of the vote here (519 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 43.0% (399 votes) and other candidates with 1.2% (16 votes), among the 928 ballots cast by the borough's 1,282 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 72.4.[61]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 66.2% of the vote here (406 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 26.8% (164 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.5% (34 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (6 votes), among the 613 ballots cast by the borough's 1,148 registered voters, yielding a 53.4% turnout.[62]

Education[edit]

Public school students in Kindergarten through eighth grade are educated as part of the Oceanport School District after the former Sea Bright Board of Education was eliminated by the New Jersey Department of Education in 2009 as a non-operating district.[63] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[64]) are Wolf Hill Elementary School[65] with 359 students in Kindergarten through 4th grade and Maple Place Middle School[66] with 292 students in grades 5 - 8.[67][68]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend Shore Regional High School, a regional high school that also serves students from the constituent districts of Monmouth Beach, Oceanport and West Long Branch.[69][70] Additionally, Sea Bright high school students have the opportunity to attend schools within the Monmouth County Vocational School District, including the five career academies.[71]

The Sea Bright beach on an early summer morning

Transportation[edit]

As of 2010, the borough had a total of 6.37 miles (10.25 km) of roadways, of which 2.71 miles (4.36 km) were maintained by the municipality, 0.08 miles (0.13 km) by Monmouth County and 3.58 miles (5.76 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[72]

The Highlands – Sea Bright Bridge, a 1,240-foot (380 m) drawbridge built in 1932, connects Highlands in the west to Sea Bright in the east, across the Shrewsbury River. The eastern terminus is at the entrance to Sandy Hook. The span is part of Route 36. Between 2008-2011 it was replaced with a fixed span instead of a drawbridge. It rises 65 feet (20 m) instead of the original span's 35 feet (11 m).[73][74]

Sea Bright can be accessed from Rumson to the west via Rumson Road/County Route 520 over the Shrewsbury River Bridge.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Sea Bright include:

Picture gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Borough Offices, Borough of Sea Bright. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 58.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Sea Bright, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Sea Bright borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 7. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Sea Bright borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Sea Bright, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Sea Bright, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  15. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  17. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 185. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  20. ^ Kimball, Stanley B. "Discovery: “Nauvoo” Found in Seven States", Ensign (magazine), April 1973. Accessed August 1, 2012. "The name itself is derived from one or both of two Hebrew roots—nawaw and nawvaw (or a varient [sic] nawveh), both of which mean something becoming, pleasant, suitable, beautiful, a pasture, a place of rest and beauty.... The earliest non-Mormon use of Nauvoo is in reference to a small fishing village of about 50 men and boys in Monmouth County on the New Jersey shore (now a part of Sea Bright). Although direct evidence is thus far lacking, this Nauvoo was most likely the result of a missionary trip by Joseph Smith and Orson Pratt into Monmouth County from Philadelphia during January 1840."
  21. ^ Mullen, Shannon. "Wall keeps beach clubs hidden oases", Asbury Park Press, September 13, 2007.Accessed August 1, 2012. "There are eight clubs in all, strung like macaroni on a child's necklace along a mile or so of coastline -- a greater concentration than you'll find in any other town on the Jersey Shore. From north to south there's Ship Ahoy, the Sands, the Surfrider, the Sea Bright Beach Club, Chapel Beach, the Tradewinds, Water's Edge and the Driftwood Cabana Club."
  22. ^ Public Notice - Beach Information, Borough of Sea Bright. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  23. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2014.
  24. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 22, 2013.
  25. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  26. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  27. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  28. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Sea Bright borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  29. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Sea Bright borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  30. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Sea Bright borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  31. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask", New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed November 30, 2014.
  32. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 6. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed December 1, 2014.
  33. ^ Borough Government, Borough of Sea Bright. Accessed July 19, 2013.
  34. ^ Monmouth County General Election Results General Election November 6, 2012, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed October 22, 2013.
  35. ^ Monmouth County General Election Results General Election November 8, 2011, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed October 22, 2013.
  36. ^ Monmouth County General Election Results General Election November 2, 2010, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed October 22, 2013.
  37. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 64, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 64, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  42. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  43. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  44. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  45. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  46. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 28, 2014.
  47. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  48. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ Monmouth County Government, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  50. ^ Freeholder Lillian G. Burry, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  51. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  52. ^ Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  53. ^ Freeholder John P. Curley, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  54. ^ Freeholder Deputy Director Serena DiMaso, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  55. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  56. ^ About the County Clerk, M. Claire French, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  57. ^ Sheriff Shaun Golden, Monmouth County Sheriff's Office. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  58. ^ Monmouth County Surrogate, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  59. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Monmouth, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  60. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  61. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  62. ^ 2009 Governor: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  63. ^ Letter to Sea Bright Borough School District, New Jersey Department of Education, dated June 30, 2009. Accessed August 1, 2012.
  64. ^ School Data for the Oceanport School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  65. ^ Wolf Hill Elementary School, Oceanport School District. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  66. ^ Maple Place Middle School, Oceanport School District. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  67. ^ Schools, Oceanport School District. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  68. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Oceanport School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  69. ^ Shore Regional High School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 29, 2013. "Shore Regional High School, located in West Long Branch, Monmouth County New Jersey, is a comprehensive secondary school that proudly serves the communities of Monmouth Beach, Oceanport, Sea Bright, and West Long Branch."
  70. ^ Fennell, Ryan. "Education Commissioner Assures Sea Bright On K-8 Funding", The Two River Times, November 30, 1999. Accessed July 31, 2012. "Currently, Sea Bright as well as Oceanport and West Long Branch are part of the Shore Regional School District. The regional school district funding is primarily based on land valuation."
  71. ^ About, Monmouth County Vocational School District. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  72. ^ Monmouth County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  73. ^ "Highlands Bridge work under way". Star-Ledger. July 11, 2008. Retrieved 2008-07-28. The 76-year-old drawbridge carries Route 36 over the Shrewsbury River between Highlands and Sea Bright. Drivers have only two choices when they pull out of Sandy Hook -- they can turn south on Route 36 and drive along the Shore through Sea Bright or head north and cross the bridge. 
  74. ^ "Demolition starts on Highlands-Sea Bright bridge". Asbury Park Press. July 15, 2008. Retrieved August 29, 2013. About 12:35 p.m. Monday, as planned, J.H. Reid Construction Co. of South Plainfield began demolishing portions of the 75-year-old drawbridge to make way for its replacement — a 65-foot-high, fixed-span bridge. 
  75. ^ Fred Alexander, International Tennis Hall of Fame. Accessed august 1, 2012. "Place of Birth: Seabright [sic], New Jersey".
  76. ^ Watrous, Peter. "Tal Farlow, 77, Jazz Guitarist Rooted in Bop", The New York Times, July 28, 1998. Accessed August 1, 2012. "Tal Farlow, one of jazz's best-known guitarists, died on Saturday at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in Manhattan. He was 77 and lived in Sea Bright, N.J., and Manhattan."
  77. ^ Staff. "LINDLEY M. GARRISON DIES IN 68TH YEAR; Secretary of War in Wilson Cabinet Succumbs in Home in Seabright, N. J. WAS A TALENTED LAWYER Differed With President on Method of Strengthening Military Defense, and Resigned.", The New York Times, October 20, 1932. Accessed August 10, 2012.
  78. ^ Staff. "COL. JOHN J. M'COOK OF NEW YORK DEAD; One of the Fighting McCooks and Well Known Lawyer --Declined Cabinet Place", Hartford Courant, September 18, 1911. Accessed August 1, 2012. "Sea Bright, N. J., Sept. 17.--Colonel John James McCook the well known New York lawyer and member of the Ohio family known as 'the Fighting McCooks,' died today at his summer home here."
  79. ^ Staff. "Juan Trippe, 81, Dies; U.S. Aviation Pioneer", The New York Times, April 4, 1981. Accessed August 1, 2012. "Juan Terry Trippe was born in Sea Bright, N.J., on June 27, 1899, to Charles White and Lucy Adeline Terry Trippe."

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Highlands
Beaches of New Jersey Succeeded by
Monmouth Beach