Seal of the President of the Philippines

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This article is about the Seal of the President of the Philippines. For other Presidential Seals, see Seal of the President (disambiguation).
Seal of the President of the Philippines
Sagisag ng Pangulo ng Pilipinas
Seal of the President of the Philippines.svg
Details
Armiger President of the Philippines
Adopted 1947 (current definition from 2004)
Escutcheon A circular blue shield with an eight-rayed golden-yellow Philippine sun at the center. Overlapping the Philippine sun is a red equilateral triangle. Inside and at the center of the equilateral triangle is the traditional golden-yellow sea lion (Ultramar) of the Coat-of-Arms granted to the City of Manila in 1596, on guard with a sword on its right paw, at hilt. Inside and at the corner of each of the three (3) angles of the equilateral triangle, a five-pointed golden-yellow star to represent Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao, respectively.
Other elements The whole are encircled at the outer edge of the blue shield by five-pointed golden-yellow stars, with one point of each star pointing outward on the imaginary radiating center lines, the number of stars conforming to the number of provinces of the Republic of the Philippines at any given time.
Use On documents from the President to members of government, and as a symbol on presidential vehicles, podiums, and other places

The Seal of the President of the Philippines (Filipino: Sagisag ng Pangulo ng Pilipinas) is a symbol used to represent the history and dignity of the President of the Philippines. Its original form was designed by Captain Galo B. Ocampo, Secretary of the Philippine Heraldry Committee, and patterned after the Seal of the President of the United States.[1] It was first used by President Manuel Roxas in 1947.

Description and Symbolism[edit]

The Seal is composed of the Coat-of-Arms of the President, which, according to Executive Order № 310 of 2004 consists of:

The Seal of the President of the Philippines shall consist of the Coat-Of-Arms of the President of the Philippines, and a white circle around the Coat-of-Arms enclosed by two (2) golden-yellow marginal rings. The white circle shall contain the words SAGISAG NG PANGULO NG PILIPINAS ("Seal of the President of the Philippines") in black letters on the upper arc, the lower arc divided by three (3) five-pointed golden-yellow stars.

Some of the symbols in the arms are derived from the National Flag, and retain their meaning. The eight-rayed sun represent the eight provinces placed under martial law in 1896 at the onset of the Philippine Revolution. On the sun there is an equilateral triangle (colored red as opposed to the Flag's white), representing liberty, equality, and fraternity, which were ideals of the Revolution. The stars at the corners of the triangle represent the three major island groups of Luzón, Visayas and Mindanao.

At the center of the coat-of-arms is a Sea-lion, which is derived from the coat-of-arms of the City of Manila granted by Philip II of Spain in 1596. It has the upper half of a lion, and the lower half and curled tail of a fish. The Sea-lion as a heraldic device ultimately comes from the lion on the coat-of-arms of Castile and León; since the islands were an overseas (ultramar) possession, the lion became a sea lion.

History[edit]

The 1981 seal on the presidential jet during Ferdinand Marcos' 1983 trip to Washington D.C.

The seal was first used by President Manuel Roxas in 1947. It was patterned after the Seal of the President of the United States, which in turn was patterned after the Great Seal of the United States, and designed by Captain Galo B. Ocampo of the Philippine Heraldry Committee, who also designed the Coat of arms of the Philippines. The Seal was officially prescribed on January 7, 1947, when Executive Order № 38 of 1947 was signed into law. It prescribed the Seal as:

SECTION 1. The coat of arms of the President of the Philippines shall be of the following design:
SHIELD: the eight-rayed Philippine sun rayonnant; on the center an equilateral triangle in gules; over-all the traditional lion (ultramar) of the ancient or original coat of arms of the City of Manila on guard with sword or at hilt; on three points of triangle three mullets
SEC. 2. The seal of the President of the Philippines shall consist of the coat of arms of the President of the Philippines encircled by the words 'Seal of the President of the Philippines'.

[2]

On July 4, 1951, President Elpidio Quirino, signed Executive Order № 457 into law prescribing that:

At the time of signing, the Philippines had 52 provinces.

On August 27, 1998, President Joseph Estrada signed Executive Order № 19, amending Executive Order № 38 of 1947 (as amended) in view of the fact that 1951, the number of provinces has increased to 78 and that there is a need to synchronize the number of stars to match the number of provinces at a given time.

After Estrada's Executive Order came into law, Roxas's Executive Order read:

Section 1. The Coat of Arms of the President of the Philippines shall be of the following design:
Shield: the eight-rayed Philippine sun rayonnant in golden yellow; on the center, an equilateral triangle in gules (red); overall the traditional sea lion of the Coat of Arms granted to the City of Manila in 1596, on guard with sword, or at hilt and one mullet in golden yellow in the corner of each of the three angles of the equilateral triangle: one mullet representing Luzon; one, Visayas; and another, Mindanao.
The whole, surrounded by stars in the form of an amulet with one point of each star outward on the imaginary radiating center lines, the number of stars conforming to the number of provinces of the Republic at any given time.

On April 20, 2004, President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo signed Executive Order № 310, which standardized the Seal and its derivative material. The Seal as it appears on government documents and property has since been redesigned to conform with the EO.

Evolution of the Presidential Seal[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Executive Order No. 310, Manuel L. Quezon III, May 29, 2005
  2. ^ Philippine Executive Order No. 38 Philippine Gazette (www.gov.ph). Retrieved on 2013-09-10.