Seaside Park, New Jersey

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Seaside Park, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Seaside Park
Seaside Park beach
Seaside Park beach
Motto: "The Family Resort"
Map of Seaside Park in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Seaside Park in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Seaside Park, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Seaside Park, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°55′32″N 74°04′44″W / 39.925666°N 74.078754°W / 39.925666; -74.078754Coordinates: 39°55′32″N 74°04′44″W / 39.925666°N 74.078754°W / 39.925666; -74.078754[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Ocean
Incorporated March 3, 1898
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Robert W. Matthies (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Administrator Bob Martucci[4]
 • Clerk Karen Barna[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 0.768 sq mi (1.989 km2)
 • Land 0.650 sq mi (1.683 km2)
 • Water 0.118 sq mi (0.305 km2)  15.35%
Area rank 524th of 566 in state
28th of 33 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 3 ft (0.9 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10][11]
 • Total 1,579
 • Estimate (2012[12]) 1,587
 • Rank 511th of 566 in state
26th of 33 in county[13]
 • Density 2,429.4/sq mi (938.0/km2)
 • Density rank 254th of 566 in state
12th of 33 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08752[14]
Area code(s) 732 Exchanges: 793, 830, 854[15]
FIPS code 3402966480[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 885391[18][2]
Website www.seasideparknj.org

Seaside Park is a borough in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,579,[9][10][11] reflecting a decline of 684 (-30.2%) from the 2,263 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 392 (+21.0%) from the 1,871 counted in the 1990 Census.[19] Seaside Park is situated on the Barnegat Peninsula, a long, narrow barrier peninsula that separates Barnegat Bay from the Atlantic Ocean.

The first inhabitants of the barrier island were Lenape Native Americans who came in search of fish, crabs, clams, and scallops. They called this area "Seheyichbi," meaning land bordering the ocean. The Atlantic Ocean provided more than food, these people began using shells in place of wooden beads as their form of currency. These Native Americans, who stayed during the summer and went inland for winter, were part of the principal Algonquian tribe that lived mainly in and around the North American Seaboard. The Algonquians in New Jersey called themselves "Lenni Lenape", which means "original people."

What is now Seaside Park was a section of Dover Township (now known as Toms River Township) until the creation of Berkeley Township in 1875. The area then became known as the Sea Side Park section of Berkeley Township. Over the next 25 years, lots were sold, houses and roads were built, and the population of Seaside Park began to grow.

On March 3, 1898, New Jersey Senate President Foster M. Voorhees, the acting Governor of New Jersey, signed a bill incorporating "Sea Side Park" as an independent borough, created from portions of Berkeley Township.[20] Originally, the town ran from 14th Avenue to North Avenue, about half its present size. An area known as the Berkeley Tract, north of the original area of the borough, was annexed on or about May 12, 1900.[21]

As the community grew, the name of the borough lost a space. In 1914, a newly appointed municipal clerk wrote the name of the borough as "Seaside Park" in the council minutes, combining the first two words. This practice continues to this day.[21]

Geography[edit]

Seaside Park is located at 39°55′32″N 74°04′44″W / 39.925666°N 74.078754°W / 39.925666; -74.078754 (39.925666,-74.078754). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.768 square miles (1.989 km2), of which, 0.650 square miles (1.683 km2) of it is land and 0.118 square miles (0.305 km2) of it (15.35%) is water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 73
1910 101 38.4%
1920 179 77.2%
1930 571 219.0%
1940 653 14.4%
1950 987 51.1%
1960 1,054 6.8%
1970 1,432 35.9%
1980 1,795 25.3%
1990 1,871 4.2%
2000 2,263 21.0%
2010 1,579 −30.2%
Est. 2012 1,587 [12] 0.5%
Population sources: 1900-2000[22]
1900-1920[23] 1900-1910[24] 1910-1930[25]
1930-1990[26] 2000[27][28] 2010[8][9][10][11]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 1,579 people, 833 households, and 404.8 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,429.4 per square mile (938.0 /km2). There were 2,703 housing units at an average density of 4,158.7 per square mile (1,605.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 97.02% (1,532) White, 0.95% (15) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 0.38% (6) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.89% (14) from other races, and 0.76% (12) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.42% (54) of the population.[9]

There were 833 households, of which 12.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 34.7% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 51.4% were non-families. 44.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 16.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.90 and the average family size was 2.60.[9]

In the borough, 12.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 19.4% from 25 to 44, 34.4% from 45 to 64, and 26.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 52.1 years. For every 100 females there were 93.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.5 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $39,271 (with a margin of error of +/- $13,400) and the median family income was $59,865 (+/- $24,222). Males had a median income of $61,019 (+/- $17,364) versus $52,083 (+/- $2,854) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $30,423 (+/- $6,397). About 19.1% of families and 24.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 59.2% of those under age 18 and 7.0% of those age 65 or over.[29]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 2,263 people, 1,127 households, and 606 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,481.5 people per square mile (1,344.2/km2). There were 2,811 housing units at an average density of 4,324.6 per square mile (1,669.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 97.79% White, 0.27% African American, 0.35% Native American, 0.62% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 0.18% from other races, and 0.71% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.30% of the population.[27][28]

There were 1,127 households out of which 16.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.3% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 46.2% were non-families. 38.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.01 and the average family size was 2.61.[27][28]

In the borough the population was spread out with 14.4% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 26.5% from 25 to 44, 27.9% from 45 to 64, and 25.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47 years. For every 100 females there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.6 males.[27][28]

The median income for a household in the borough was $45,380, and the median income for a family was $58,636. Males had a median income of $42,813 versus $27,333 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $30,090. About 6.4% of families and 8.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.3% of those under age 18 and 1.5% of those age 65 or over.[27][28]

History[edit]

While Sea Side Park was going through the process of being incorporated, the Senate Amusement Company of Philadelphia was working on plans to build an oceanside attraction in Seaside Heights within feet of the border to Sea Side Park. Their plan was to build a covered pier to house a carousel. The structure was built in 1915 under the direction of Joseph Vanderslice of Senate Amusement Company. Budget issues caused the business to not open in 1916, and the amusement ride and building was subsequently sold to Frank Freeman. The combination of the completion of the Toms River Bridge on October 23, 1914[30] and the DuPont Avenue carousel and boardwalk are what likely led to the 219% population growth shown between the 1910 and 1920 censuses in Sea Side Park.[31]

Disasters[edit]

On June 9, 1955, a malfunctioning neon sign component caused a fire at a shop on the corner of Ocean Terrace and DuPont Avenue. The fire was driven by winds estimated at 50 miles per hour (80 km/h), blowing the fire south and engulfing the entire pier. The fire was stopped at Stockton Avenue due in part to the fact that the boardwalk and pier ended there. In what bceame known as Freeman's Fire, a total of 85 buildings were destroyed with an estimated $4 million in damage from the conflagration.[32]

On March 8, 1962, Seaside Park was affected by a nor'easter that had churned offshore for two days. The storm, which destroyed a learge section of the borough's boardwalk, is variously referred to as the Ash Wednesday Storm, the Five High Storm and the Great March Storm of 1962.[33][34]

On September 12, 2013, a ten-alarm fire swept from the Funtown Pier northward.[35] The fire is believed to have started under the boardwalk, below the Kohr's Kustard stand at the southern end of the pier. The wind pushed it northward, and fire crews were able to make a stand at Lincoln Ave. by tearing up the newly replaced boardwalk which was destroyed less than a year ago by Hurricane Sandy.[36] Jack & Bill's Bar and Kohr's Kustard were two businesses that were both destroyed in the 1955 and 2013 fires.

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Seaside Park is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[6]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Seaside Park is Republican Robert W. Matthies, whose term of office expires on December 31, 2015. Borough Council Members are Council President Michael Tierney (R, 2015), Gail Coleman (R, 2015), Jean Contessa (I, 2014), Nancy Koury (D, 2013), Jack Moyse (R, 2013), David Nicola (R, 2014) and Andrew Sbordone (R, 2013).[37][38][39]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Seaside Park is located in the 3rd Congressional District[40] and is part of New Jersey's 9th state legislative district.[10][41][42] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Seaside Park had been in the 10th state legislative district.[43]

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Jon Runyan (R, Mount Laurel Township).[44] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[45][46] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[47][48]

For the 2014-15 Session, the 9th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Christopher J. Connors (R, Lacey Township) and in the General Assembly by DiAnne Gove (R, Long Beach Township) and Brian E. Rumpf (R, Little Egg Harbor Township).[49] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[50] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[51]

Ocean County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections and serving staggered three-year terms of office, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[52] At an annual reorganization held in the beginning of January, the board chooses a Director and a deputy Director from among its members. As of 2014, Ocean County's Freeholders (with department directorship, party affiliation, residence and term-end year listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari (Public Works, Senior Services; R, Toms River, term ends December 31, 2014),[53] Freeholder Deputy Director John C. Bartlett, Jr. (Finance, Parks and Recreation; Pine Beach, 2015),[54] John P. Kelly (Law and Public Safety; Eagleswood Township, 2016),[55] James F. Lacey (Transportation; Brick Township, 2016)[56] and Gerry P. Little (Human Services; Surf City, 2015)[57][58][59] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Scott M. Colabella (R, 2015, Barnegat Light),[60][61] Sheriff Michael Mastronardy (R, 2016; Toms River) and Surrogate Jeffrey Moran (R, 2018, Beachwood).[62][63][64]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,349 registered voters in Seaside Park, of which 245 (18.2%) were registered as Democrats, 535 (39.7%) were registered as Republicans and 569 (42.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[65] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 85.4% (vs. 63.2% in Ocean County) were registered to vote, including 97.1% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 82.6% countywide).[65][66]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 62.2% of the vote here (665 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 34.4% (368 votes) and other candidates with 1.9% (20 votes), among the 1,069 ballots cast by the borough's 1,479 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.3%.[67] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 62.2% of the vote here (716 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 36.1% (416 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (12 votes), among the 1,151 ballots cast by the borough's 1,544 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 74.5.[68]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 66.2% of the vote here (546 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 25.2% (208 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 4.8% (40 votes) and other candidates with 1.2% (10 votes), among the 825 ballots cast by the borough's 1,383 registered voters, yielding a 59.7% turnout.[69]

Education[edit]

The Seaside Park School District served public school students in Kindergarten through sixth grade, with students now attending the Toms River Regional Schools after the Seaside Park district closed the doors of its school in 2010.[70]

Students in public school for seventh through twelfth grades attend the schools of the Central Regional School District, which also serves students from the municipalities of Berkeley Township, Island Heights, Ocean Gate and Seaside Heights.[71] The schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[72]) are Central Regional Middle School[73] for grades 7 and 8 (660 students) and Central Regional High School[74] for grades 9 - 12 (1,306 students).[75][76]

Transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides seasonal bus service in Seaside Park on the 137 route to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan and to Newark on the 67 line.[77]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Administrative & Executive Office, Borough of Seaside Park. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  5. ^ Office of the Clerk, Borough of Seaside Park. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 53.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Seaside Park, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  8. ^ a b "DataUniverse - 2010 Census Populations: Ocean County", Asbury Park Press. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Seaside Park borough, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 5. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Seaside Park borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Seaside Park, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Seaside Park, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 30, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 205. Accessed October 23, 2012.
  21. ^ a b Anderson, Andrew J.; and Anderson, D. Gail. History, Borough of Seaside Park. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  22. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Ocean County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  23. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  24. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  25. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  26. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  27. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Seaside Park borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  28. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Seaside Park borough, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  29. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Seaside Park borough, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  30. ^ "The Toms River Bridge". discoverseasideheights.com. Retrieved September 13, 2013. 
  31. ^ "Boardwalk History, Some Seaside Heights' Firsts three ladies in front of the carousel, Seaside Heights, NJ This picture was taken in 1926 and is one of the earliest photos of Freeman's carousel. A Carousel on the Beach". discoverseasideheights.com. Discover Seaside Heights. Retrieved September 13, 2013. 
  32. ^ Chang, David. "Boardwalk Fire Brings Back Memories of Devastating Seaside Blaze Nearly 60 Years Ago", WCAU, September 16, 2013. Accessed September 18, 2013. "On June 9, 1955, a fire broke out at a shop on the corner of Ocean Terrace and DuPont Avenue in Seaside Heights. Driven by 50 mile per hour winds, the fire spread south, until it was finally placed under control at Stockton Avenue in Seaside Park..."
  33. ^ Rose, Lisa. "50 years later, N.J. remembers the storm that swallowed the Jersey Shore", The Star-Ledger, March 8, 2012. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  34. ^ Salvini, Emil R. "The Great Atlantic Storm of 1962". njtvonline.org. NJ Today. Retrieved September 13, 2013. 
  35. ^ "Massive Seaside Park fire under control". WPVI-TV. September 12, 2013. Retrieved September 12, 2013. 
  36. ^ "Seaside boardwalk fire is still smoldering; no cause determined yet". nj.com. Retrieved September 13, 2013. 
  37. ^ Mayor and Council, Borough of Seaside Park. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  38. ^ 2013 Elected Officials of Ocean County, Ocean County, New Jersey. p. 10. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  39. ^ Borough of Seaside Park, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  40. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 64, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 64, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  44. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  45. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  46. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  47. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  48. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  49. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 24, 2014.
  50. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  51. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  52. ^ Freeholder History, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  53. ^ Freeholder Joseph H. Vicari, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  54. ^ Freeholder John C. Bartlett, Jr., Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  55. ^ Freeholder John P. Kelly, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  56. ^ Freeholder James F. Lacey, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  57. ^ Freeholder Gerry P. Little, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  58. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  59. ^ County Directory, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  60. ^ County Clerk, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  61. ^ Biography of Scott M. Colabella, Office of the County Clerk. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  62. ^ County Surrogate Jeffrey W. Moran, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  63. ^ 2013 Elected Officials of Ocean County, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  64. ^ 2013 General Election Winner's List, Ocean County Clerk's Office, November 6, 2013. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  65. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Ocean, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  66. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  67. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  68. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  69. ^ 2009 Governor: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed January 1, 2013.
  70. ^ Miller, Patricia A. "Seaside Park Confirms: High Schoolers Will Attend Toms River Regional; Borough discussing with attorneys who picks up $10,000 tab for each student", TomsRiverPatch, June 3, 2011. Accessed January 1, 2013. "Seaside Park closed the Seaside Park Elementary School last year and now has a sending arrangement for K-6 students with Toms River Regional. Former County Schools Superintendent Bruce Greenfield recommended in 2008 that Seaside Park align itself with a K-12 district. Central Regional accepts grades 7-12."
  71. ^ Central Regional School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 23, 2013. "The Central Regional School District is located in the Bayville section of Berkeley Township and draws from the constituent districts of Berkeley Township, Island Heights, Ocean Gate, Seaside Heights, and Seaside Park."
  72. ^ School Data for the Central Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  73. ^ Central Regional Middle School, Central Regional School District. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  74. ^ Central Regional High School, Central Regional School District. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  75. ^ Schools, Central Regional School District. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  76. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Central Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  77. ^ Ocean County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed January 1, 2013.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Seaside Heights
Beaches of New Jersey Succeeded by
Island Beach State Park