Seat

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Seats at a railway station.
An sitting arrangement made by the political party during Namvistar Din in India.

A seat is place to sit, often referring to the area one sits upon as opposed to other elements like armrests.[1]

A seat is also known as a bench, a chair, a chaise longue, chesterfield, a couch, a davenport or a settee.[2]

Types of seat[edit]

The following are examples of different kinds of seat:

Etymology[edit]

The word seat comes from Middle English sete and from Old Norse sæti; akin to Old English gesete seat, sittan to sit. The first known use of the word seat is in the 13th century.[3] Also public seats tend to have a lot of bird 'droppings' on them.

In literature[edit]

Children's author Hugh Lofting[4] referred to a seat in this passage from his novel The Story of Doctor Dolittle; “He came strolling down the gravel-walk, humming a sad song, till he reached a stone seat right under the tree where the parrot and the monkey were hiding.”[5]

Children's author and playwright L. Frank Baum[6] referred to a seat in this passage of his novel Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz; “At once a little girl rose from her seat and walked to the door of the car, carrying a wicker suit-case in one hand and a round bird-cage covered up with newspapers in the other, while a parasol was tucked under her arm.”[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Seat". The Free Dictionary. Retrieved May 31, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Seat". Thesaurus.com. Retrieved 2012-05-18. 
  3. ^ "Seat". Merriam Webster. Retrieved 2012-05-18. 
  4. ^ "Hugh Lofting". The Literature Network. Retrieved 2012-05-18. 
  5. ^ "Seat". The Free Dictionary By Farlex. Retrieved 2012-05-18. 
  6. ^ "L. Frank Baum". The Literature Network. Retrieved 2012-05-18. 
  7. ^ "Seat". The Free Dictionary By Farlex. Retrieved 2012-05-18. 

External links[edit]

  • Media related to Seats at Wikimedia Commons