Second-generation antidepressant

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The second-generation antidepressants are a class of antidepressants characterized primarily by the era of their introduction (approximately coinciding with the 1970s and 1980s), rather than by their chemical structure or by their pharmacological effect. As a consequence, there is some controversy over which treatments actually belong in this class.

The term "Third generation antidepressant" is sometimes used to refer to even newer antidepressants,[1] often selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as; fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil) and sertraline (Zoloft), as well as some 'Non SSRI' antidepressants such as mirtazapine, nefazodone, venlafaxine, duloxetine and reboxetine. However, this usage is not universal.

Examples[edit]

This list is not exhaustive, and different sources vary upon which items should be considered second-generation.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Olver JS, Burrows GD, Norman TR (2001). "Third-generation antidepressants: do they offer advantages over the SSRIs?". CNS Drugs 15 (12): 941–54. doi:10.2165/00023210-200115120-00004. PMID 11735614. 

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