Second Chinese domination of Vietnam

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History of Vietnam Map of Vietnam
2879–0258 Hồng Bàng Dynasty
2879–1913 Early Hồng Bàng
1912–1055 Mid-Hồng Bàng
1054–258 Late Hồng Bàng
257–207 Thục Dynasty
207–111 Triệu Dynasty
11140 1st Chinese domination
40–43 Trưng Sisters
43–544 2nd Chinese domination
544–602 Early Lý Dynasty
602–938 3rd Chinese domination
939–967 Ngô Dynasty
968–980 Đinh Dynasty
980–1009 Early Lê Dynasty
1009–1225 Later Lý Dynasty
1225–1400 Trần Dynasty
1400–1407 Hồ Dynasty
1407–1427 4th Chinese domination
1428–1788 Later Lê Dynasty
1527–1592 Mạc Dynasty
1545–1787 Trịnh lords
1558–1777 Nguyễn lords
1778–1802 Tây Sơn Dynasty
1802–1945 Nguyễn Dynasty
1858–1945 French imperialism
from 1945 Republic
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The second Chinese domination marks a period when Vietnam fell into Chinese control for a second time, between the end of the Trưng Sisters and the start of the Anterior Lý Dynasty. The Trung sisters' independence rule had been a relatively brief interruption during the Chinese domination of Vietnam which continued from 111 BC to 939.

The late Han Dynasty of China strengthened its control over the region in 43 and Han governors ruled the area. Even when the Eastern Han Dynasty split into the Three Kingdoms in 220, Vietnam remained under the control of the Chinese state of Wu. The Chinese prefect of Jiaozhi Shi Xie ruled Vietnam as an autonomous warlord and was posthumously deified by later Vietnamese Emperors.[1]

A female rebel named Triệu Thị Trinh briefly pushed the Chinese rulers out in 248, but was soon overthrown. Then Vietnam was under Jin China and the first half of the Southern and Northern Dynasties. The domination ended by 544, when Lý Nam Đế came to power.[2]

Some other local rebellions were organized by:

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Preceded by
Trưng Sisters revolt
Dynasty of Vietnam
43–544
Succeeded by
Anterior Lý Dynasty