Second inauguration of Abraham Lincoln

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Second presidential inauguration of Abraham Lincoln
Lincoln taking the oath at his second inauguration.jpg
Lincoln taking the oath at his second inauguration. Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase administering oath of office.
Date March 4, 1865; 149 years ago (1865-03-04)
Location Washington, D.C.
the Capitol's east front
Participants Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Johnson

The second inauguration of Abraham Lincoln as the 16th President of the United States took place on March 4, 1865. The inauguration marked the commencement of the second term of Abraham Lincoln as President and only term of Andrew Johnson as Vice President. Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase administered the Oath of office.[1]

Vice Presidential oath and inaugural address[edit]

Before the president was sworn in, Vice President-elect Andrew Johnson took his oath. At the ceremony Johnson, who had been drinking to offset the pain of typhoid fever (as he explained later), gave a rambling address in the Senate chamber and appeared obviously intoxicated.[2] Historian Eric Foner has labeled the inauguration "a disaster for Johnson" and his speech "an unfortunate prelude to Lincoln's memorable second inaugural address." At the time Johnson was ridiculed in the press as a "drunken clown".[3]

Inaugural address[edit]

While Lincoln did not believe his address was particularly well received at the time, it is now generally considered one of the finest speeches in American history. Historian Mark Noll has deemed it "among the handful of semisacred texts by which Americans conceive their place in the world."[4]

See also[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Inauguration of President Abraham Lincoln, 1865". Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies. Retrieved 27 January 2009. 
  2. ^ Trefousse p. 198
  3. ^ Brinkley, Alan; David Dyer (Eds.) (2004). The American Presidency. New York, New York: Houghton Mifflin. p. 191. ISBN 0-618-38273-9. 
  4. ^ Noll, Mark (2002). America's God: From Jonathan Edwards to Abraham Lincoln. New York, New York: Oxford University Press. p. 426. ISBN 0-19-515111-9. 

External links[edit]