Secretariat of Public Security

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For the Mexico City agency, see Ministry of Public Security (Mexico City).
Mexico
Secretariat of Public Security
Secretaría de la Seguridad Pública
SSP logo 2012.svg
Secretariat of Public Security logo
Agency overview
Formed 2000
Dissolved 2013
Jurisdiction Mexico
Headquarters Av. Constituyentes 947, Belén de Las Flores, Álvaro Obregón, 01110 Ciudad de México, Distrito Federal, Mexico Mexico City
19°23′44.2536″N 99°13′17.619″W / 19.395626000°N 99.22156083°W / 19.395626000; -99.22156083
Employees 21,600
Annual budget $126 million[citation needed] (2010)
Agency executive Genaro García Luna, Secretary[1]
Child agency Federal Police (Mexico)
Website http://www.ssp.gob.mx

The Mexican Secretariat of Public Security or Secretariat of Public Safety also known as Ministry of Public Security and Ministry of Public Safety (Spanish: Secretaría de Seguridad Pública, SSP), was the federal ministry of the Mexican Executive Cabinet[2] which aimed to preserve freedom, order and public peace, and safeguard the integrity and rights of the people, the Assistant Attorney General and Powers of the Union, to prevent the commission of crimes, develop public security policy of the Federal Executive and propose policy on crime, administer the federal prison system, and for the treatment of juvenile offenders, in terms of the powers him by the Organic Law of the Federal Public Administration[2] and other federal laws and regulations, decrees, agreements and orders of the President of the Republic. It had its headquarters in Álvaro Obregón, Mexico City.[3]

President Enrique Peña Nieto announced on November 15, 2012 that he will eliminate the Secretariat of Public Security, as part of his planned administrative reforms, after he takes office.[4] It was dissolved on 3 January 2013 and will be replaced by the "National Commission of Security" (Spanish: Comision Nacional de Seguridad), an internal organ of the Secretariat of the Interior[5] as seen on their website.[6]

Functions[edit]

The Secretariat will plan and conduct their activities in accordance with the objectives, strategies and priorities, National Development Plans and the National Program are issued by the Head of the Federal Executive. According to Organic Law of the Federal Civil Service in its 'Article 30a' has an office on the following main functions, to develop security policies and propose public policy on crime at the federal level, including the rules, instruments and actions to effectively prevent the commission of crimes, to propose Federal Executive measures to ensure consistency of policy between the criminal divisions of the federal public service, chairing the National Council for Public Security, at the Council of National Security, policies, actions and strategies of coordination in the field of crime prevention and criminal justice policy for the entire national territory, dealing expeditiously with complaints and citizens' complaints regarding the exercise of its powers, organize, manage, administer and monitor the PFP and to ensure the honest performance of their staff and implement its disciplinary system, safeguard the integrity and heritage of the people, prevent the commission of federal crimes, and to preserve the Freedom, order and public peace, establish a system to collect, analyze, examine and process information for the prevention of crime, using methods that ensure strict adherence to human rights and run the penalties for federal crimes and to administer the federal prison system, as well as organize and conduct activities to support the released.

Organization[edit]

For the study, planning, and dispatching of the matters within its competence, the Secretariat will be composed of the following administrative units and bodies:

  • I. Subsecretary Strategy and Police Intelligence;
  • II. Subsecretary Prevention, Linkage and Human Rights;
  • III. Subsecretary Federal Prison System;
  • IV. Subsecretary Assessment and Institutional Development;
  • V. Major Official;
  • VI. General Coordination of Legal Affairs;
  • VII. General Coordination of Mexico Shelf;
  • VIII. General Directorate of Social Communication;
  • IX. Directorate General for International Affairs;
  • X. Directorate General for Coordination and Development of State and Municipal police;
  • XI. Directorate General of Private Security;
  • XII. General Crime Prevention;
  • XIII. DG Entailment and Civic Participation;
  • XIV. Directorate General of Human Rights;
  • XV. General Directorate of Standardization and Development Facility;
  • XVI. General Directorate of Security Transfer of Offenders and Prison;
  • XVII. Directorate General of Planning and Evaluation;
  • XVIII. Directorate General of Transparency and Regulatory Improvement;
  • XIX. General Directorate of Professional Police Career and regulations;
  • XX. Directorate General of Planning and Budget Organization;
  • XXI. Directorate General of Human Resources;
  • XXII. Department of Material Resources and General Services;
  • XXIII. Directorate General of Public Works and Services;
  • XXIV. Directorate General of Administrative Systems and
  • XXV. Decentralized administrative bodies:
    • a) Federal Police;
    • b) Executive Secretary of the National System of Public Security;
    • c) Prevention and Social Rehabilitation and
    • d) Council of Children.

List of secretaries[edit]

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ The Holder, Accessed 2011-07-19.
  2. ^ a b Organic Law of the Federal Public Administration, Article 26
  3. ^ "About the SSP." Secretariat of Public Security. Retrieved on December 12, 2010. "Ave.Constituyentes No. 947 floor, Col. Belén de las Flores, Del. Álvaro Obregón, C.P. 01110, Mexico, D.F."
  4. ^ Peña Nieto Announces Public Security Reforms. McCleskey, Claire O'Neill. InSightCrime.org. Retrieved November 29, 2012.
  5. ^ http://www.animalpolitico.com/2013/01/manana-r-i-p-oficial-a-la-ssp/
  6. ^ Davis, Jack (3 January 2013). "Mexico Formally Dissolves Public Security Ministry". InSight Crime. Retrieved 4 January 2013. 

External links[edit]