Sediment basin

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For sedimentary basins in geology, see Sedimentary basin and Structural basin.
Sediment basin installed on a construction site.

A sediment basin is a temporary pond built on a construction site to capture eroded or disturbed soil that is washed off during rain storms, and protect the water quality of a nearby stream, river, lake, or bay. The sediment-laden soil settles in the pond before the runoff is discharged. Sediment basins are typically used on construction sites of 5 acres (20,000 m2) or more, where there is sufficient room. They are often used in conjunction with erosion controls and other sediment control practices. On smaller construction sites, where a basin is not practical, sediment traps may be used.[1]

On some construction projects, the sediment basin is cleaned out after the soil disturbance (earth-moving) phase of the project, and modified to function as a permanent stormwater management system for the completed site, either as a detention basin or a retention basin.[2]

Sediment trap[edit]

Sediment trap installed on a construction site.

A sediment trap is a temporary device installed on a construction site to capture eroded or disturbed soil that is washed off during rain storms, and protect the water quality of a nearby stream, river, lake, or bay. The trap is basically an embankment built along a waterway or low-lying area on the site. They are typically installed at the perimeter of a site and above storm drain inlets, to keep sediment from entering the drainage system. Sediment traps are commonly used on small construction sites, where a sediment basin is not practical. Sediment basins are typically used on construction sites of 5 acres (20,000 m2) or more, where there is sufficient room.[3]

Sediment traps are installed before land disturbance (earth moving, grading) begins on a construction site. The traps are often used in conjunction with erosion controls and other sediment control practices.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Florida Department of Environmental Protection. Tallahassee, FL. "Florida Erosion and Sediment Control Inspector's Manual: Temporary Sediment Basin." Section 4.26. Published 2002.
  2. ^ California Stormwater Quality Association. Menlo Park, CA. "California Stormwater BMP Handbook: Sediment Basin." Fact Sheet No. SE-2. January 2003.
  3. ^ California Stormwater Quality Association. Menlo Park, CA. "California Stormwater BMP Handbook: Sediment Trap." Fact Sheet No. SE-3. January 2003.
  4. ^ Florida Department of Environmental Protection. Tallahassee, FL. "Florida Erosion and Sediment Control Inspector's Manual: Temporary Sediment Trap." Section 4.25. Published 2002.

External links[edit]