Seeing Is Believing: Handicams, Human Rights and the News

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Seeing Is Believing: Handicams, Human Rights and the News
Directed by Peter Wintonick
Katerina Cizek
Produced by Francis Miquet
Katarina Cizek
Peter Wintonick
Written by Peter Wintonick
Katerina Cizek
Narrated by Katerina Cizek
Music by Eric Lemoyne
Production
  company
Necessary Illusions
Release date(s)
Running time 60 minutes
Country Canada
Language English

Seeing Is Believing: Handicams, Human Rights and the News is a 2002 Canadian documentary film co-directed by Katerina Cizek and Peter Wintonick about the impact of camcorders and digital media on citizen media creation and grassroots democracy.[1]

The one-hour documentary focuses on Joey Lozano, a videographer helping a tribe in the rural southern Philippines where business interests are taking precedence over human rights.[2] It also looks at Serb atrocities in Bosnia, skinhead activity in Prague as well as how portable cameras are used by police to film protesters. The film also explores the role of faxes in the Tiananmen Square uprising and the then-emerging use of text messaging in protests.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Volmers, Eric (15 October 2004). "Future is now for documentaries". Kitchener-Waterloo Record. Retrieved 19 November 2013. 
  2. ^ McCullough, Jane (25 September 2003). "Eyes wide open". Fast Forward Weekly (Calgary). Retrieved 19 November 2013. 
  3. ^ Eisner, Ken (16 October 2002). "Review: ‘Seeing is Believing: Handicams, Human Rights and the News’". Variety. Retrieved 19 November 2013. 

External links[edit]