Seeley, California

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Seeley
census-designated place
Seeley's welcome sign
Seeley's welcome sign
Location in Imperial County and the state of California
Location in Imperial County and the state of California
Coordinates: 32°47′35″N 115°41′28″W / 32.79306°N 115.69111°W / 32.79306; -115.69111Coordinates: 32°47′35″N 115°41′28″W / 32.79306°N 115.69111°W / 32.79306; -115.69111[1]
Country  United States
State  California
County Imperial
Area[2]
 • Total 1.242 sq mi (3.218 km2)
 • Land 1.219 sq mi (3.157 km2)
 • Water 0.023 sq mi (0.061 km2)  1.9%
Elevation[1] -36 ft (-11 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 1,739
 • Density 1,353.3/sq mi (507.5/km2)
Time zone Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 92273
Area code(s) 760
FIPS code 06-70798
GNIS feature IDs 1661418, 2409303

Seeley is a census-designated place (CDP) in Imperial County, California. Seeley is located 7.5 miles (12 km) west of El Centro.[3] The population was 1,739 at the 2010 census, up from 1,624 in 2000. It is part of the El Centro Metropolitan Area.

History[edit]

The first post office at Seeley was opened in 1909.[3] The name honors Henry Seeley, an early developer of Imperial County.[3]

Seeley is one of the oldest established communities in Imperial County, tracing its history back to the early years of the 20th century. Originally established as a stage stop on the shores of the now dead "Blue Lake", Seeley was known originally as Silsbee.

NAF El Centro, the winter home of the Blue Angels, was built adjacent to Seeley in 1946. In 1964, Interstate 8 was run a mile south of Seeley, marking the lowest elevation on the Interstate Highway System at -52 feet.

Correction: Silsbee and Seeley were not the same town. Silsbee was located on the shores of Blue Lake. Seeley is northwest of the location of Silsbee. Seeley is north of Interstate 8 and the old location of Blue Lake is south of Interstate 8. Blue Lake was caught up in the path of the New River when a disaster created the Salton Sea circa 1907 and was drained into the Salton Sea via the flow of the river. Silsbee was a proposed resort town platted by a man named Silsbee. The loss of Blue Lake ended the resort aspect of this location and the development of Silsbee ended. The approximate location of Blue Lake can be found by entering "Blue Drain, Imperial County, CA" into mapping software. There is an historical marker on Silsbee Road marking the site of the town and the lake. The area is now an agricultural field with no easily identifiable trace of the lake or town other than the marker.

Geography[edit]

Bordered on the west by the New River, Seeley sits astride the Imperial Fault and above what was once the basin of the "Blue Lake". Like much of the Imperial Valley, Seeley lies entirely below sea level.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.2 square miles (3.1 km2), of which 1.2 square miles (3.1 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.052 km2) (1.9%) is water.

Climate[edit]

This are has a large amount of sunshine year round due to its stable descending air and high pressure. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Seeley has a mild desert climate, abbreviated "Bwh" on climate maps.[4]

Demographics[edit]

2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census[5] reported that Seeley had a population of 1,739. The population density was 1,399.9 people per square mile (540.5/km²). The racial makeup of Seeley was 746 (42.9%) White, 19 (1.1%) African American, 7 (0.4%) Native American, 21 (1.2%) Asian, 2 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 793 (45.6%) from other races, and 151 (8.7%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1,489 persons (85.6%).

The Census reported that 1,739 people (100% of the population) lived in households, 0 (0%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 0 (0%) were institutionalized.

There were 493 households, out of which 276 (56.0%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 268 (54.4%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 114 (23.1%) had a female householder with no husband present, 28 (5.7%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 40 (8.1%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 2 (0.4%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 66 households (13.4%) were made up of individuals and 27 (5.5%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.53. There were 410 families (83.2% of all households); the average family size was 3.83.

The population was spread out with 577 people (33.2%) under the age of 18, 195 people (11.2%) aged 18 to 24, 421 people (24.2%) aged 25 to 44, 373 people (21.4%) aged 45 to 64, and 173 people (9.9%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 28.5 years. For every 100 females there were 95.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.3 males.

There were 556 housing units at an average density of 447.6 per square mile (172.8/km²), of which 246 (49.9%) were owner-occupied, and 247 (50.1%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 5.3%; the rental vacancy rate was 10.5%. 892 people (51.3% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 847 people (48.7%) lived in rental housing units.

2000[edit]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 1,624 people, 438 households, and 382 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,346.3 people per square mile (518.2/km²). There were 460 housing units at an average density of 381.3 per square mile (146.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 54.7% White, 0.7% Black or African American, 1.0% Native American, 2.3% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 35.9% from other races, and 5.2% from two or more races. 81.5% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 438 households out of which 54.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.4% were married couples living together, 16.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 12.6% were non-families. 9.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.7 and the average family size was 4.0.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 38.2% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 28.8% from 25 to 44, 17.1% from 45 to 64, and 7.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 27 years. For every 100 females there were 96.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.2 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $31,058, and the median income for a family was $31,667. Males had a median income of $28,654 versus $20,625 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $9,539. About 22.2% of families and 26.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 36.0% of those under age 18 and 18.0% of those age 65 or over.

Politics[edit]

In the state legislature, Seeley is in the 40th Senate District, represented by Democrat Ben Hueso,[7] and the 56th Assembly District, represented by Democrat V. Manuel Perez.[8]

Federally, Seeley is in California's 51st congressional district, represented by Democrat Juan Vargas.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Seeley". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. 
  2. ^ U.S. Census
  3. ^ a b c Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Quill Driver Books. p. 1466. ISBN 9781884995149. 
  4. ^ Climate Summary for Seeley, California
  5. ^ "2010 Census Interactive Population Search: CA - Seeley CDP". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2014. 
  6. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ "Senators". State of California. Retrieved April 11, 2013. 
  8. ^ "Members Assembly". State of California. Retrieved April 11, 2013. 
  9. ^ "California's 51st Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved April 11, 2013.