Selenoyl fluoride

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Selenoyl fluoride
Selenoyl fluoride structure.png
Selenoyl fluoride 3D Space Filling.png
Identifiers
14984-81-7 YesY
ChemSpider 10329076 N
Jmol-3D images Image
Properties
SeO2F2
Molar mass 148.95 g/mol
Appearance Gas.
Melting point −99.5 °C (−147.1 °F; 173.7 K)[1]
Boiling point −8.4 °C (16.9 °F; 264.8 K)[2]
Except where noted otherwise, data is given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
 N verify (what isYesY/N?)
Infobox references

Selenoyl fluoride, selenoyl difluoride, selenium oxyfluoride, or selenium dioxydifluoride is a chemical compound with the formula SeO2F2.

Structure[edit]

The shape of the molecule is a distorted tetrahedron with the O-Se-O angle being 126.2°, the O-Se-F angle being 108.0° and F-Se-F being 94.1°.[3] The Se-F bond length is 1.685 Å and the selenium to oxygen bond is 1.575 Å long.[4]

Formation[edit]

Selenoyl fluoride can be formed by the action of warm fluorosulfonic acid on barium selenate[5] or selenic acid. SeO3 + SeF4 can give this gas along with other oxyfluorides.

Reactions[edit]

Selenoyl fluoride is more reactive than its analogon sulfuryl fluoride. It is easier to hydrolyse and to reduce. It may react violently upon contact with ammonia.

Selenoyl fluoride reacting with xenon difluoride gives FXeOSeF5.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics
  2. ^ Seppelt, K. "Selenoyl difluoride" Inorganic Syntheses, 1980, volume XX, pp. 36-38. ISBN 0-471-07715-1.
  3. ^ Wai-Kee Li, Gong-du Zhou, Thomas C. W. Mak Advanced structural inorganic chemistry page 651 2008 ISBN 0-19-921694-0
  4. ^ Kolbjørn Hagen, Virginia R. Cross and Kenneth Hedberg "The molecular structure of selenonyl fluoride, SeO2F2, and sulfuryl fluoride, SO2F2, as determined by gas-phase electron diffraction" Journal of Molecular Structure 1978 volume 44 issue 2 page 187 doi:10.1016/0022-2860(78)87027-6
  5. ^ Advanced Inorganic Chemistry A Comprehensive Text Cotton and Wilkinson
  6. ^ http://www.scribd.com/doc/30122309/Noble-Gas-Compounds