Seligman, Arizona

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Seligman, Arizona
CDP
Welcome sign
Welcome sign
Location in Yavapai County and the state of Arizona
Location in Yavapai County and the state of Arizona
Coordinates: 35°19′42″N 112°52′27″W / 35.32833°N 112.87417°W / 35.32833; -112.87417Coordinates: 35°19′42″N 112°52′27″W / 35.32833°N 112.87417°W / 35.32833; -112.87417
Country United States
State Arizona
County Yavapai
Area
 • Total 6.4 sq mi (16.6 km2)
 • Land 6.4 sq mi (16.5 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 5,242 ft (1,598 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total 456
 • Density 71.5/sq mi (27.6/km2)
Time zone MST (UTC-7)
ZIP code 86337
Area code(s) 928
FIPS code 04-65420
GNIS feature ID 0011070

Seligman (Havasupai: Thavgyalyal[1]) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yavapai County, Arizona, United States. The population was 456 at the 2000 census.

History[edit]

Between 1889-1891, Seligman was established by the Theut and Moultrie families. Both were prosperous slaughterhouse owners in Southern antebellum families who lost everything in the Civil War and the following Reconstruction periods. They moved West hoping to find a new life in the largely uninhabited territory of Arizona. They took over the area of the Seligman Campsite from the Apache. Before that the location had been a settlement of the Havasupai people.

Geography[edit]

Seligman is located at 35°19′42″N 112°52′27″W / 35.32833°N 112.87417°W / 35.32833; -112.87417 (35.328199, −112.874303),[2] at 5,240 feet (1,600 m) in elevation, alongside the Big Chino Wash, in a north section of Chino Valley; the wash is a major tributary of the Verde River. Seligman was a stage stop on the Mojave Road, and its successor Historic U.S. Route 66.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the Seligman CDP has a total area of 6.4 square miles (17 km2), all of it land.

Climate data for Seligman, Arizona (1981–2010 normals)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 79
(26)
84
(29)
90
(32)
92
(33)
99
(37)
105
(41)
110
(43)
106
(41)
101
(38)
93
(34)
85
(29)
75
(24)
110
(43)
Average high °F (°C) 53.0
(11.7)
56.5
(13.6)
62.7
(17.1)
70.1
(21.2)
79.4
(26.3)
89.0
(31.7)
92.6
(33.7)
90.0
(32.2)
84.5
(29.2)
73.9
(23.3)
61.8
(16.6)
52.9
(11.6)
72.2
(22.3)
Average low °F (°C) 23.4
(−4.8)
25.4
(−3.7)
28.8
(−1.8)
33.7
(0.9)
40.7
(4.8)
47.9
(8.8)
56.3
(13.5)
55.8
(13.2)
48.2
(9)
37.6
(3.1)
28.6
(−1.9)
22.6
(−5.2)
37.4
(3)
Record low °F (°C) −18
(−28)
−12
(−24)
−5
(−21)
10
(−12)
14
(−10)
26
(−3)
33
(1)
34
(1)
26
(−3)
12
(−11)
−5
(−21)
−17
(−27)
−18
(−28)
Precipitation inches (mm) 1.17
(29.7)
1.15
(29.2)
1.09
(27.7)
.55
(14)
.37
(9.4)
.29
(7.4)
1.82
(46.2)
2.18
(55.4)
1.40
(35.6)
1.11
(28.2)
.88
(22.4)
.89
(22.6)
12.91
(327.9)
Snowfall inches (cm) 3.7
(9.4)
2.4
(6.1)
1.2
(3)
.6
(1.5)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
.1
(0.3)
.8
(2)
1.9
(4.8)
10.6
(26.9)
Avg. precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 4.6 4.6 5.2 2.8 2.7 1.9 7.6 8.4 4.7 3.5 3.0 4.9 53.9
Avg. snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 1.6 1.1 .8 .3 0 0 0 0 0 .1 .4 1.4 5.7
Source: NOAA (extremes 1904–present)[3]

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 456 people, 205 households, and 121 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 71.5 people per square mile (27.6/km²). There were 281 housing units at an average density of 44.0/sq mi (17.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 85.09% White, 0.22% Black or African American, 1.97% Native American, 1.54% Asian, 0.22% Pacific Islander, 6.14% from other races, and 4.82% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 19.08% of the population.

There were 205 households out of which 29.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.9% were married couples living together, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.5% were non-families. 36.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.22 and the average family size was 2.91.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 25.4% from 25 to 44, 24.1% from 45 to 64, and 18.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 96.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.8 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was US$23,833, and the median income for a family was US$29,722. Males had a median income of US$27,083 versus US$13,594 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was US$11,976. About 14.4% of families and 16.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.2% of those under age 18 and 16.5% of those age 65 or over.

In culture[edit]

The historic Seligman Sundries building along old U.S. Route 66. Vehicle on the right is a 1972 Ford Ranchero
Delgadillo's Snow Cap Drive-In, founded by Juan Delgadillo along Route 66 in 1953

John Lasseter has said in interviews that the town of Radiator Springs in the Pixar film Cars is loosely based on Seligman.[5] While researching the history of Route 66, Lasseter met Seligman barber Angel Delgadillo, who told him how traffic through the town virtually disappeared on the day that nearby Interstate 40 opened.[6]

Delgadillo's brother Juan opened Delgadillo's Snow Cap Drive-In in 1953; the eatery has since become a famous roadside attraction. Author, Route 66 historian and Cars voice actor Michael Wallis covers the history of the restaurant in his book, Route 66: The Mother Road.

A place to visit, which is regularly new, is Grand Canyon Caverns. A business that does tours and ghost walks in their caverns. They talk about the different things that the cavern represented or things that happened in the caverns. The caverns reach deep down and speak historically through their workers.

Education[edit]

"The Havasu House", a former Harvey House in Seligman that was torn down April 14, 2008

Seligman is part of the Seligman Unified School District. Its basketball team won the 1-A state championship in 2006 after consecutive second round exits in the tournament in the two previous years. As well, its baseball team has lost in the final game of the state championship for three straight years. The school colors are red, white, and black, and its teams are called the Antelopes.

Notable natives and residents[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hinton, Leanne (1984). A dictionary of the Havasupai language. 
  2. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  3. ^ "NowData - NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2013-07-19. 
  4. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Search results. Joe Williams. June 4, 2006. The spirit of 66: In the animated movie 'Cars,' Hollywood remembers when it was not just another highway.
  6. '^ Internet Movie Database. The Inspiration for 'Cars. (2006), with Angel Delgadillo, barber and John Lasseter, director.

External links[edit]