Seminole County, Oklahoma

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Seminole County, Oklahoma
Map of Oklahoma highlighting Seminole County
Location in the state of Oklahoma
Map of the United States highlighting Oklahoma
Oklahoma's location in the U.S.
Founded 1907
Seat Wewoka
Largest city Seminole
Area
 • Total 641 sq mi (1,660 km2)
 • Land 633 sq mi (1,639 km2)
 • Water 8 sq mi (21 km2), 1.26%
Population (Est.)
 • (2012) 25,450
 • Density 40/sq mi (15/km²)
Congressional district 5th

Seminole County is in the east central part of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 25,482.[1] Its county seat is Wewoka[2]. Before Oklahoma's admission as a state, the county was the entire small portion of Indian Territory allocated to the Seminole people, who were removed from Florida in the 1820s. It is notable for the Greater Seminole Field, one of the most important oil fields ever found, which is still producing.[3] It extends into nearby counties. In the early years of the oil boom, workers and adventurers flooded into the county, rapidly tripling the population. As oil production later declined, jobs and residents left.

History[edit]

Seminole County has been an important part of the Oklahoma and United States petroleum industry for over 80 years. The Greater Seminole Field was one of the most important oil fields ever found and is still producing.[3] Discovered one field after another in 1926, it contained an estimated 822,000,000 barrels (130,700,000 m3) of oil.[4] To group the fields together, the oil companies decided to come up with a name, and this was suggested by Paul Hedrick, oil editor of the Tulsa World. Other important oil fields in the area were the Cromwell oil field, discovered in 1923, and the Maud oil field. The Maud field, discovered in 1927 by Amerada Petroleum, was the first discovery using reflection seismology.[5] This marked the beginning of the use of modern geophysical methods in the petroleum industry.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,659 km² (641 mi²), of which 1,638 km² (633 mi²) is land and 21 km² (8 mi²) (1.26%) is water.[6] The county is bounded on the north by the North Canadian River and on the south by the Canadian River.[7]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 19,964
1920 23,808 19.3%
1930 79,621 234.4%
1940 61,201 −23.1%
1950 40,672 −33.5%
1960 28,066 −31.0%
1970 25,144 −10.4%
1980 27,473 9.3%
1990 25,412 −7.5%
2000 24,894 −2.0%
2010 25,482 2.4%
Est. 2012 25,450 −0.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
2012 Estimate[1]
Age pyramid for Seminole County, Oklahoma, based on census 2000 data.

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 24,894 people, 9,575 households, and 6,788 families residing in the county. The population density was 15/km² (39/mi²). There were 11,146 housing units at an average density of 7/km² (18/mi²). The racial makeup of the county was 70.74% White, 5.59% Black or African American, 17.39% Native American, 0.22% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.74% from other races, and 5.28% from two or more races. 2.22% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 94.7% spoke English, 2.9% Muskogee and 1.7% Spanish as their first language.

There were 9,575 households out of which 30.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.30% were married couples living together, 13.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.10% were non-families. 25.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.05.

In the county, the population was spread out with 26.30% under the age of 18, 9.00% from 18 to 24, 24.40% from 25 to 44, 23.40% from 45 to 64, and 16.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 93.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $25,568, and the median income for a family was $30,791. Males had a median income of $25,954 versus $18,285 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,956. About 16.70% of families and 20.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.90% of those under age 18 and 14.40% of those age 65 or over.

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of January 15, 2012[10]
Party Number of Voters Percentage
  Democratic 7,856 66.16%
  Republican 3,052 25.70%
  Unaffiliated 966 8.14%
Total 11,874 100%

Politics[edit]

Presidential election results[11]
Year Republican Democrat
2008 65.29% 5,600 34.71% 2,977
2004 60.66% 5,624 39.34% 3,648
2000 50.99% 4,011 48.09% 3,783

Communities[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ a b Bobby D. Weaver, "Greater Seminole Field", Oklahoma Encyclopedia of History and Culture
  4. ^ Historical Dictionary of the Petroleum Industry, Appendix 13
  5. ^ Historical Dictionary of the Petroleum Industry, p. 40
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ Mullins, William H. Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. "Seminole County." Retrieved October 1, 2013.
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved November 13, 2013. 
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  10. ^ http://www.ok.gov/elections/documents/reg_0112.pdf
  11. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". Retrieved 2011-06-11. 

Coordinates: 35°10′N 96°37′W / 35.17°N 96.61°W / 35.17; -96.61