Seminole music

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Seminole music is the music of the Seminole people, an indigenous people of the Americas who formed in Florida in the 18th century. Today most live in Oklahoma, but a minority continue in Florida. They have three federally recognized tribes, and some people belong to bands outside those groups. Their traditional music includes extensive use of rattles, bongos, and flutes.

Seminole folk songs include those used to treat the sick and injured, and to encourage animals to be easily hunted. Hunting songs were a cappella and call-and-response.

The two major ritual dances were the Green Corn Dance, held in June, and the Hunting Dance, held in October. Other informal dances were held throughout the year, with some specific dances only performed in either summer or winter. Many dances were connected with an animal spirit, such as the Snake, the Crawfish and the very important Alligator.

References[edit]

  • Densmore, Francis (1956). Seminole Music. Florida Heritage Collection.