Senelec

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A Senelec agency at Ziguinchor in the Casamance region

Senelec (Société nationale d'électricité du Sénégal) is the national electricity company of Senegal.

History[edit]

Senelec was established in 1983 after the nationalization and merger of Électricité du Sénégal and Société sénégalaise de distribution d'électricité.[1] In 1998, the Agency for Rural Electrification (ASER) and the Electricity Regulatory Board were split from Senelec and the company was put into privatization.[2] In 1999, the consortium of Hydro-Québec and Elyo (Suez Lyonnaise des Eaux) bought 34% of Senelec's shares. The deal was annulled by President Abdoulaye Wade in March 2000, and Hydro-Québec and Elyo withdrew from Senegal in January 2001.[3]

The company represents Senegal in the West African Power Pool.

Operations[edit]

Senelec has a production capacity of 632.9 MW, 90 MW of which comes from the Manantali Hydroelectric Power Plant in Mali; however, the electricity output is only 519.4 MW due to aging and faulty equipment.[4] The company has 2,500 employees and 645,000 customers.[5]

In 2006, Senelec got 88 billion CFA francs (US$185 million) of subsidies and its arrears alone amount to 1.5% of GDP.[6]

Senelec plans a new coal-fired power station 35 km SE of Dakar, the Sendou power station, with a net capacity of 115 MW.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "senegal". Oracle. Retrieved 2009-02-14. 
  2. ^ "Senegal Country Commercial Guide 2008" (PDF). United States Commercial Service. 2008-02-06. Retrieved 2009-02-14. 
  3. ^ Levon Sevunts (2001-05-14). "A river of disease: Canada-backed dam contributes to 8,500 African deaths a year". Montreal Gazette. Retrieved 2009-02-14. 
  4. ^ Hamadou Tidiane Sy (2008-06-21). "Senegal Receives $80 Million World Bank Loan for Power Upgrade". Bloomberg. Retrieved 2009-02-14. 
  5. ^ Boucar Diouf (2009-02-13). "Energie : Peut-on mieux faire avec ce que l’on a ? (Energy: Can we do better with what we have?)" (in French). Walf Fadjri. Retrieved 2009-02-14. 
  6. ^ Alistair Thomson (2007-06-12). "IMF team in Senegal look at spending, transparency". Reuters. Retrieved 2009-02-14. 

External links[edit]