Sense and Sensibilia (Aristotle)

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Sense and Sensibilia (or On Sense and the Sensible, On Sense and What is Sensed, On Sense Perception; Greek: Περὶ αἰσθήσεως καὶ αἰσθητῶν, Latin: De sensu et sensibilibus, De sensu et sensili, De sensu et sensato) is one of the short treatises by Aristotle that make up the Parva Naturalia.

The English title Sense and Sensibilia adopted by the Revised Oxford Translation repeats the title J. L. Austin chose for his 1962 book Sense and Sensibilia, which in turn incorporated an allusive echo of Jane Austen's title Sense and Sensibility.[1]

Commentaries[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Kevin White, "Translator's Introduction", in Aquinas, Commentaries on Aristotle's "On Sense and What Is Sensed" and "On Memory and Recollection", trans. Kevin White and Edward M. Macierowski, Washington, D.C.: CUA Press, 2005, p. 6.

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