Sergei Demekhine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Sergei Demekhine
Сергей Демехин
Country  Russia
Residence Moscow, Russia
Born (1984-03-30) 30 March 1984 (age 30)
Kursk, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union
Height 1.92 m (6 ft 3 12 in)
Turned pro 2001
Plays Right–handed
Prize money $25,848
Singles
Career record 37–52
Career titles 0 ATP, 1 ITF
Highest ranking No. 673 (30 July 2007)
Doubles
Career record 106–69
Career titles 0 ATP, 8 ITF
Highest ranking No. 438 (17 October 2005)
Last updated on: 8 March 2011.

Sergei Gennadyievich Demekhine (Russian: Сергей Геннадьевич Демехин; born 30 March 1984) is a Russian tennis coach and former player. Under his guidance, Vera Zvonareva reached two Grand Slam finals – at the 2010 Wimbledon Championships and the 2010 US Open — and World No. 2 ranking. Demekhin also occasionally works as a model.

Personal life[edit]

Demekhin was born on 30 March 1984 to father Gennadyi and mother Natalia, and has a sister, Elena. He was born in Kursk, but currently resides in Moscow.[1]

Tennis career[edit]

As a professional tennis player, Demekhine won one ITF Futures title in singles, and eight in doubles. He played the qualifications for the Kremlin Cup in 2001,[2] 2002,[3] 2003[4] 2006[5] and 2008,[6] but never reached the main draw. Demekhin made two appearances in the ATP main draw in doubles, both at the Kremlin Cup. In 2005, he and Igor Kunitsyn lost to Mariusz Fyrstenberg and Răzvan Sabău 5–3, 5–4(6) in the first round. In 2008, Demekhin partnered with Konstantin Kravchuk, but they were beaten by Sergiy Stakhovsky and Potito Starace 7–6(4), 1–6, [10–7] in the first round. He has been inactive since 2009.

Coaching career[edit]

Demekhine briefly coached Russian player Alla Kudryavtseva,[7] before he began coaching Vera Zvonareva. The two began working together in April 2010, after the 2010 Family Circle Cup in Charleston, South Carolina.[8] At first, he was her hitting partner and then became her coach.[9] Under his guidance, Zvonareva reached the finals of the 2010 Wimbledon Championships[10][11] and the 2010 US Open,[12] the semifinals of the 2011 Australian Open,[13] and the World No. 2 ranking.[14] In April 2011 Vera Zvonareva split with Demekhine.[15]

Career statistics[edit]

IFT Futures singles finals (1–0)[edit]

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Winner 1. 11 May 2008 Bucharest, Romania Clay Russia Sergei Krotiouk 5–7, 6–1, 6–4

ITF Futures doubles finals (8–12)[edit]

Outcome # Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents in the final Score
Runner–up 1. 4 November 2001 Sardinia, Italy Hard Russia Igor Kunitsyn Italy Stefano Mocci
Croatia Ivan Stelko
3–6, 4–6
Runner–up 2. 25 November 2001 Sardinia, Italy Hard Russia Igor Kunitsyn Brazil Josh Goffi
Canada Chris James
3–6, 6(4)–7
Runner–up 3. 4 May 2002 Mumbai, India Hard Russia Ivan Syrov India Mustafa Ghouse
India Vijay Kannan
3–6, 6(3)–7
Runner–up 4. 30 June 2002 Sardinia, Italy Clay Italy Stefano Tarallo Italy Florian Allgauer
Argentina Federico Cardinali
7–5, 2–6, 4–6
Runner–up 5. 25 August 2002 Saransk, Russia Clay Russia Ivan Syrov Russia Teymuraz Gabashvili
Russia Alexander Pavlioutchenkov
4–6, 6(3)–7
Runner–up 6. 15 December 2002 Orense, Spain Hard Russia Ivan Syrov United Kingdom Oliver Freelove
Andorra Joan Jiménez Guerra
4–6, 2–6
Runner–up 7. 13 April 2003 Frascati, Italy Clay Russia Ivan Syrov Hungary Gergely Kisgyörgy
Italy Giancarlo Petrazzuolo
4–6, 2–1, retired
Winners 1. 29 August 2004 Krasnoarmeisk, Russia Hard Russia Alexander Pavlioutchenkov Russia Philipp Mukhometov
Russia Evgueni Smirnov
6–2, 6–4
Winners 2. 17 April 2005 Karshi, Uzbekistan Hard Russia Igor Kunitsyn Uzbekistan Murad Inoyatov
Uzbekistan Denis Istomin
6–4, 5–7, 6–4
Runner–up 8. 7 May 2005 Namangan, Uzbekistan Hard Russia Andrei Stoliarov South Africa Raven Klaasen
Russia Konstantin Kravchuk
2–6, 7–6(5), 6(4)–7
Winners 3. 11 September 2005 Minsk, Belarus Clay Russia Alexander Krasnorutskiy Russia Konstantin Kravchuk
Russia Denis Matsukevitch
7–6(8), 7–6(5)
Winners 4. 18 September 2005 Minks, Belarus Hard Russia Alexander Krasnorutskiy Russia Konstantin Kravchuk
Russia Denis Matsukevitch
6–2, 4–6, 6–1
Runner–up 9. 16 July 2006 Carpi, Italy Clay Italy Luca Vanni Italy Mattia Livraghi
Italy Matteo Volante
6–1, 6(8)–7, 4–6
Winners 5. 23 July 2006 Carpi, Italy Clay Italy Luca Vanni Chile Hermes Gamonal
Chile Guillermo Hormazábal
6–2, 6–3
Winners 6. 17 February 2008 La Habana, Cuba Hard Belarus Pavel Katliarov Venezuela Luis Javier Cuellar Contreras
Cuba Roberto Maytin
6(2)–7, 6–4, [10–5]
Runner–up 10. 24 February 2008 La Habana, Cuba Hard Belarus Pavel Katliarov Venezuela Piero Luisi
Cuba Roberto Maytin
1–6, 6–4, [10–8]
Winners 7. 12 April 2008 Moscow, Russia Carpet (i) Russia Konstantin Kravchuk United Kingdom Chris Eaton
United Kingdom Alexander Slabinsky
6–1, 6–2
Winners 8. 23 May 2008 Bucharest, Romania Clay Belarus Pavel Katliarov Romania Victor-Mugurel Anagnastopol
France Thomas Cazes Carrere
2–6, 7–5, [10–8]
Runner–up 11. 21 June 2008 Minsk, Belarus Hard Belarus Pavel Katliarov Canada Pierre-Ludovic Duclos
Russia Dmitri Sitak
5–7, 4–6
Runner–up 12. 21 September 2008 Sochi, Russia Clay Russia Valery Rudnev Russia Mikhail Fufygin
Russia Vitali Reshetnikov
2–6, 1–6

References[edit]

External links[edit]