Series of Dreams

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"Series of Dreams"
Single by Bob Dylan
Recorded March 23, 1989 & January 1991
Genre Rock
Length

5:52 (on Bootleg Series Volumes 1-3)

6:27 (on Bootleg Series Volume 8)
Label Columbia
Writer(s) Bob Dylan
Producer(s)

Daniel Lanois

Music sample

"Series Of Dreams" is a song written and composed by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. Originally recorded for his 26th album Oh Mercy and produced by Daniel Lanois, this song was never used in the album but was later remixed and included in Bootleg Series Volumes 1-3, Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits Volume 3, and Bootleg Series Volume 8. According to the booklet in Bootleg Series Volumes 1-3 it was recorded on March 23, 1989. It is one of Dylan's major works of the 1980s and has surrealistic lyrics which differ from Dylan's earlier surrealistic songs such as "Desolation Row" and "Visions of Johanna".[according to whom?]

Lyrical structure[edit]

One of Dylan's most ambitious compositions, "Series of Dreams" is given a tumultuous production from Lanois. The lyrics are fairly straightforward, giving a literal description of the turmoil encountered by the narrator during a "series of dreams." However, the descriptions quickly unfold into a set of highly evocative verses.

Recording[edit]

In his autobiography Chronicles, Vol. 1, Dylan wrote about the song's recording,

"although Lanois liked the song, he liked the bridge better, wanted the whole song to be like that. I knew what he meant, but it just couldn't be done. Though I thought about it for a second, thinking that I could probably start with the bridge as the main part and use the main part as the bridge...the idea didn't amount to much and thinking about the song this way wasn't healthy. I felt like it was fine the way it was — didn't want to lose myself in thinking too much about changing it." [1]

During a Sound Opinions interview broadcast on Chicago FM radio, Lanois told Chicago Tribune critic Greg Kot that "Series of Dreams" was his pick for the opening track, but ultimately, the final decision was Dylan's. Music critic Tim Riley would echo these sentiments, writing that "'Series of Dreams' should have been the working title song to Oh Mercy, not a leftover pendant."[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chronicles, volume 1 Chronicles, Vol. 1