Serious Gaming

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This article is about the professional gaming team. For the type of game, see Serious game.
Serious Gaming
Srs logo.jpg
Location Amsterdam, Netherlands
Founded 2004
Manager(s) Netherlands Sebastiaan Peeperkorn
Sponsors Razer USA
Divisions First-person shooter, real-time strategy
Website www.serious-gaming.com

Serious Gaming is a professional gaming team based in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. It was founded in 2004 by entrepreneur Bas Peeperkorn.[1] Serious Gaming is known for their achievements in first-person shooter Deathmatch tournaments, most notably those by Quake series players Maciej Krzykowski and Alexey Yanushevsky.

History[edit]

2005

Serious Gaming was founded in 2004 by Bas Peeperkorn, the team's first signing was Painkiller player Niels van Tilborg. Painkiller was the game used for the $1,000,000 USD 2005 CPL World Tour and following van Tilborg the following players were signed and represented Serious Gaming throughout the tour: Fredrik Edesater and Stefan Timmermans. Highlights for the team included a ninth place finish at the Chile stop and two players being among the 32 players in the world tour finals.[2]

In 2005 Serious Gaming also competed in televised competition at the World eSport Games in Seoul, Korea, being represented at the second edition of the event by a Counter-Strike division consisting of Finnish players.[3] This division would disband shortly after their stay in Seoul.

2006-2007

Following the 2005 World Tour the main focus of the first-person shooter Deatmatch scene switched from Painkiller to the newly released Quake IV and Serious Gaming followed. Contracts with van Tilborg and Edesater ended, Timmermans would take a management position and help guide two newly signed players in the professional gaming scene: Markus Andersen and Maciej Krzykowski. Andersen would develop into a champion player at the national level but never take the step to international competition. Kryzkowski quickly established himself as a major contender in international competition, being recognized as the newcomer of the year in all of eSports in 2006. Kryzkowski ended up winning the Quake competition at ESWC 2007 without losing a map, becoming the youngest Quake and ESWC world champion in history.[4]

2006 was also the year Serious Gaming established a Warcraft III: The Frozen Throne division, originally signing Oskar Rudberg and Jos Buijvoets. Rudberg would retire shortly after joining and Buijvoets transitioned into a managerial role. The team signed and released a variety of players including (now) professional gamers Benjamin Baker[5] and Daniel Spenst.[6] Eventually a stable line-up of players would emerge that represented the team for several years including Kevin van der Kooi, Nikolaus Cassidy and Hjalmar Högberg.

Serious Gaming also signed two separate European champion Call of Duty 2 teams, the first of which disbanded several months after joining and the second of which disbanded after unsuccessfully trying to transition to Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare.[7]

2008-2010

Following the collapse of the World Series of Video Games the focus of the Deathmatch scene switched back to Quake III in 2008. Serious Gaming signed Alexey Yanushevsky[8] in July 2008. Yanushevsky would win the 2008 Electronic Sports World Cup with Kryzkowski being unable to defend his title due to his visa being rejected.[9] Yanushevsky would later also win the professional tournament at QuakeCon 2008 which was the first time QuakeLive was used at a major professional gaming event, this game would quickly become the standard for professional Deathmatch competition and remains to be until today. The two would compete in various Quake competitions throughout 2008, 2009 and 2010 and in Tek-9 Network's inaugarul QuakeLive ranking (February 2010) Yanushevsky was ranked the world's number one QuakeLive player with Kryzkowski taking a third place.[10] Also signed November 1, 2009 was Adrien Denis "in full harmony with the teams philosophy of converting young talented players into tournament winners".[11]

Individual Serious Gaming players won tournaments at the national and continental level.[1] After signing Kim Dong Hwan the team also competed at the highest levels of team leagues, culminating in a third place at the Warcraft 3 Champions League season XVI. Kim was recognized as one of the most impressive newcomers in Warcraft III.[12] In 2010 Cassidy and Buijvoets would transition to form a StarCraft II squad competing in the newly released StarCraft II beta while both still filling a role in the WarCraft III division. This year van der Kooi would leave Serious Gaming to lead a Heroes of Newerth division for professional gaming team fnatic.[13] Added in 2010 would be Lennart Roest in order to ensure the team's viability in team competitions.[14] On May 21, 2010 van der Kooi re-joined the real-time strategy roster as part of the StarCraft II squad.[15] He would be joined by Dlovan van den Bosch on June 14, 2010 [16] and Alexander Hein on August 11, 2010.[17]

Serious Gaming also signed a French Defense of the Ancients division in 2008.[18] Several months after announcing the team the Electronic Sports World Cup announced the inclusion of Defense of the Ancients at their main event.[19] Serious Gaming Defense of the Ancients ended up winning the French championship and qualify for the 2008 Electronic Sports World Cup where they would take 7th place.[20] Following this tournament the Serious Gaming organisation and its Defense of the Ancients division parted amicably.

Current team structure[edit]

Management[edit]

  • Netherlands Bas Peeperkorn, 2004–present (owner)
  • Netherlands Jos Buijvoets, 2006–present (real-time strategy)

Players[edit]

  • Poland Maciej Krzykowski, 2006–present (Quake series)
  • Belarus Alexey Yanushevsky, 2008–present (Quake series)
  • United States Nikolaus Cassidy, 2007-2008 / 2009–present[21] (StarCraft II)
  • Belgium Adrien Denis, 2009–present (Quake Series)
  • South Korea Kim Dong Hwan, 2009–present (StarCraft II)
  • Netherlands Lennart Roest, 2010–present (StarCraft II)
  • Netherlands Kevin van der Kooi, 2007-2010 / 2010–present (StarCraft II)
  • Netherlands Dlovan van den Bosch 2010–present (StarCraft II)
  • Germany Alexander Hein 2010–present (StarCraft II)

Notable former players and management[edit]

  • Sweden Hjalmar Högberg, 2007-2010 (retired[22])
  • United Kingdom Benjamin Baker, 2006-2007 (signed with Four Kings[23])
  • Germany Daniel Spenst, 2006 (signed with SK Gaming)
  • Netherlands Stefan Timmermans, 2005–2010 (Deathmatch manager and player)

Notable honours[edit]

2010[edit]

  • 1st - Ukraine ASUS Summer - Yanushevsky (QuakeLive)
  • 1st - United States QuakeCon 2010 professional tournament - Yanushevsky (QuakeLive)
  • 2nd - France Electronic Sports World Cup 2010 - Krzykowski (QuakeLive)
  • 1st - Sweden DreamHack Summer Kaspersky QUAKE LIVE Championships - Kryzkowski (QuakeLive)
  • 2nd - Sweden DreamHack Summer Kaspersky QUAKE LIVE Championships - Yanushevsky (QuakeLive)
  • 1st - Netherlands ESL Electronic Pro Series Benelux season 4 - Denis (QuakeLive)
  • 1st - Russia ASUS Spring - Yanushevsky (QuakeLive)
  • 3rd - Germany ESL Intel Extreme Masters IV World Championship Finals - Kryzkowski (QuakeLive)
  • 4th - Germany ESL Intel Extreme Masters IV World Championship Finals - Yanushevsky (QuakeLive)
  • 1st - Russia ASUS Winter - Yanushevsky (QuakeLive)
  • 3rd - Germany WarCraft III Champions League season XVI - Real Time Strategy division (WarCraft III: The Frozen Throne)
  • 1st - Germany ESL Extreme Masters IV European Championship Finals - Yanushevsky (QuakeLive)
  • 2nd - Germany ESL Extreme Masters IV European Championship Finals - Kryzkowski (QuakeLive)
  • 1st - South Korea XP League VI - Dong Hawn (WarCraft III: The Frozen Throne)

2009[edit]

  • 4th - South Korea International e-Sports Festival - van der Kooi (WarCraft III: The Frozen Throne)
  • 1st - Sweden Dreamhack Winter professional competition - Kryzkowski (QuakeLive)
  • 2nd - Sweden ESL Electronic Pro Series Scandanivia season 1 - Högberg (WarCraft III: The Frozen Throne)
  • 1st - Russia ASUS Autumn - Yanushevsky (Quake III)
  • 3rd - United States QuakeCon Masters Tournament - Yanushevsky (QuakeLive)
  • 2nd - United Arab Emirates Intel Extreme Masters Global Challenge - Yanushevsky (QuakeLive)
  • 1st - Russia ASUS Summer - Yanushevsky (Quake III)
  • 2nd - United States BlizzCon Regional Championship - Cassidy (WarCraft III: The Frozen Throne)
  • 2nd - Germany European Nations Championship - van der Kooi, Buijvoets [as part of team Netherlands] (WarCraft III: The Frozen Throne)
  • 2nd - Netherlands ESL Electronic Pro Series Benelux season 2 - van der Kooi (WarCraft III: The Frozen Throne)

2008[edit]

2007[edit]

  • 2nd - United Kingdom Multiplay i32 $20.000 Quake IV Cup - Kryzkowski (Quake IV)
  • 2nd - China Stars War IV - Karev [As part of team Romantic Elves] (WarCraft III: The Frozen Throne)
  • 2nd - Sweden DreamHack Winter - Högberg (WarCraft III: The Frozen Throne)
  • 1st - France Electronic Sports World Cup - Kryzkowski (Quake IV)
  • 1st - United States World Series of Video Games, Louisville - Kryzkowski (Quake IV)
  • 3rd - Sweden Wonderbase - Call of Duty 2 division (Call of Duty 2)
  • 1st - Netherlands Crossfire Prize Challenge 2 - Call of Duty 2 division (Call of Duty 2)
  • 1st - Netherlands Samsung Netgamez - Call of Duty 2 division (Call of Duty 2)
  • 1st - United Kingdom Multiplay i30 & Belkin Tournament - Kryzkowski (Quake IV)

2006[edit]

2005[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b [1][dead link]
  2. ^ August - 15 - 2009 (2004-04-12). "Painkiller Zone » Blog Archive » CPL World Tour Brackets". Pkzone.org. Retrieved 2013-12-05. 
  3. ^ "Counter-Strike: Team Wings move to Serious Gaming". SK Gaming. 2005-10-09. Retrieved 2013-12-05. 
  4. ^ [2][dead link]
  5. ^ [3][dead link]
  6. ^ [4][dead link]
  7. ^ "GBT - Call of Duty 2 Champs Join Serious Gaming". Gamingbucket.com. Retrieved 2013-12-05. 
  8. ^ [5][dead link]
  9. ^ [6][dead link]
  10. ^ "Esports Heaven". Tek-9.org. Retrieved 2013-12-05. 
  11. ^ [7][dead link]
  12. ^ [8][dead link]
  13. ^ by Sasquatch. "Professional Gaming Organization". compLexity Gaming. Retrieved 2013-12-05. 
  14. ^ [9][dead link]
  15. ^ [10][dead link]
  16. ^ "srs mit Dlovan « Wer? Wohin? Warum? «". Readmore.de. Retrieved 2013-12-05. 
  17. ^ [11][dead link]
  18. ^ [12][dead link]
  19. ^ [13][dead link]
  20. ^ "Board Message". Forum.lowyat.net. Retrieved 2013-12-05. 
  21. ^ Turtle Entertainment GmbH (1990-01-06). "ESL: srs.razer Serious.Razer - Team - WC3L - Europe - ESL - The eSports League". Esl.eu. Retrieved 2013-12-05. 
  22. ^ [14][dead link]
  23. ^ "Warcraft III: Four Kings add DeMusliM". SK Gaming. 2007-05-09. Retrieved 2013-12-05.