Sessility (botany)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The perennial wildflower Trillium sessile possesses leaves that are sessile at the top of the stem.

In botany, sessility (meaning "sitting", used in the sense of "resting on the surface") is a characteristic of plant parts which have no stalk.[1][2] Flowers or leaves are borne directly from the stem or peduncle, and thus lack a petiole or pedicel. The leaves of the vast majority of monocotyledons lack petioles.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Beentje, H.; Williamson, J. (2010). The Kew Plant Glossary: an Illustrated Dictionary of Plant Terms. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew: Kew Publishing. 
  2. ^ Hickey, M.; King, C. (2001). The Cambridge Illustrated Glossary of Botanical Terms. Cambridge University Press.