Seventeenth Dynasty of Egypt

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The Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Dynasties of ancient Egypt are often combined under the group title, Second Intermediate Period. The Seventeenth Dynasty dates approximately from 1580 to 1550 BC.[1]

The Seventeenth Dynasty covers a period of time when Egypt was split into a set of small Hyksos-ruled kingdoms. It is mainly Theban rulers contemporary with the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Dynasties.

In March 2012, French archeologists examining a limestone door in the Amun-Ra temple in Luxor discovered hieroglyphs with the name Senakhtenre, the first evidence of this king dating to his lifetime.[2]

The last two kings of the dynasty opposed the Hyksos rule over Egypt and initiated a war that would rid Egypt of the Hyksos kings and began a period of unified rule, the New Kingdom.

Kamose, the second son of Seqenenre Tao, was the brother of Ahmose I – the first king of the Eighteenth Dynasty.

Rulers[edit]

Known rulers of the Seventeenth Dynasty are as follows:[1]

Dynasty XVII pharaohs
Pharaoh Prenomen Reign (BCE) Burial Consort(s)
Rahotep Sekhemre-wahkhaw ca 1585 BC
Sobekemsaf I Sekhemre-wadjkhaw 7 years Nubemhat
Sobekemsaf II Sekhemre-shedtawy Robbed during the reign of Ramesses IX Nubkhaes
Intef Sekhemre-wepmaat Dra' Abu el-Naga'?
Intef Nubkheperre Dra' Abu el-Naga' Sobekemsaf
Sekhemre-Heruhirmaat Intef Sekhemre-heruhermaat Haankhes
Ahmose Senakhtenre 1 year Tetisheri
Tao Seqenenre c. 1560 4 years Ahmose Inhapy
Sitdjehuti
Ahhotep I
Kamose Wadjkheperre 1555 to 1550 BC 5 years Ahhotep II?

Finally, king Nebmaatre may have been a ruler of the early 17th dynasty.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Shaw, Ian, ed. (2000). The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt. Oxford University Press. p. 481. ISBN 0-19-815034-2. 
  2. ^ "A Pharaoh of the Seventeenth dynasty identified at Karnak". CFEETK – Centre Franco-Égyptien d'Étude des Temples de Karnak. 
  3. ^ K. S. B. Ryholt, Adam Bülow-Jacobse, The political situation in Egypt during the second intermediate period, c. 1800-1550 B.C., pp 168, 170, 171, 179, 204, 400

External links[edit]