Seventh Posture

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The Seventh Posture of Sir Richard Francis Burton's translation of The Perfumed Garden is an unusual sex position not described in other classical sex manuals. The receiving partner lies on his or her side. The penetrating partner faces the receiver, straddling the receiver's lower leg, and lifts the receiver's upper leg on either side of the body onto the crook of the penetrating partner's elbow or onto the shoulder. While some references describe this position as being "for acrobats and not to be taken seriously,"[1] others have found it very comfortable, especially during pregnancy.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hooper, Anne J., "Anne Hooper's Kama Sutra". DK Publishing. 1st ed., 1998. ISBN 1-56458-649-9, 160 pages.